Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am taking a C++ class and have a assignment which requires me to dynamically allocate memory for a struct. I don't recall ever going over this in class and we only briefly touched on the new operator before going on to classes. Now I have to

"Dynamically allocate a student and then prompts the user for student’s first name, a last name, and A - number(ID number). "

my struct is written like

struct Student
{
    string firstName, lastName, aNumber;
    double GPA;
};

I tried Student student1 = new Student; but that doesn't work and I'm unsure as how I do this dynamically with a struct.

share|improve this question
    
I have figured out how to allocate memory with Student* student = new Student but now I do not know how to fill in the members for student such as firstName, lastName. –  sircrisp Feb 22 '12 at 15:19
    
My book doesn't actually refer to filling struct member variables by pointer but thanks for your helpful advice. –  sircrisp Feb 22 '12 at 15:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Change you definition to

struct Student 
{
    string firstName, lastName, aNumber;
    double GPA;
};

Notice I have changed the placement of the struct keyword

and you have to do Student* student1 = new Student instead.

When you dynamically allocated memory for a struct you get a pointer to a struct.

Once you are done with the Student you also have to remember to to release the dynamically allocated memory by doing a delete student1. You can use a std::shared_ptr to manage dynamically allocated memory automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't mean to put Student before struct. But the Student* fixed it, and I have to return the pointer so thanks :] –  sircrisp Feb 22 '12 at 15:08
    
I have to return the pointer to main and will delete it when the program ends. –  sircrisp Feb 22 '12 at 15:09
2  
@sircrisp This is exactly what unique_ptr does. Except it does it for you. Don't use raw pointers, they suck. –  Etienne de Martel Feb 22 '12 at 15:12
3  
@sircrisp sounds like you really need to consult your class material. Or a good C++ book. You need to use -> to access members through pointers. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 22 '12 at 15:27
1  
@sircrisp: Judging from this question, this is not the way you learn. –  sbi Feb 22 '12 at 17:08

This should be what you need:

std::unique_ptr<Student> x(new Student);
share|improve this answer
    
I doubt it. How can you make such a statement when you don't even know why he is using new? –  James Kanze Feb 22 '12 at 15:21
    
@James: Because there are virtually no situations whatsoever in which raw new is actually justified as opposed to instantly constructing a smart pointer of your choice? –  Puppy Feb 22 '12 at 16:26
    
Nonsense. A lot depends on the application, but most pointers should be raw pointers. (For that matter, you can't avoid it, since this is a raw pointer.) unique_ptr has very specific semantics; when you need those semantics, it's excellent, but when you don't, it's an error to use it. Since we don't know why he's allocating dynamically (I suspect that in fact, he shouldn't be using dynamic allocation at all), we can't make any assumptions concerning the appropriateness of unique_ptr. –  James Kanze Feb 22 '12 at 17:17
    
@JamesKanze: I never said anything about raw pointers in general. Only that dynamically allocated resources should always be protected by a resource-managing class such as a smart pointer in the general case. Of course, he likely doesn't need dynamic allocation at all, but requesting dynamic allocation, and no mention of additional requirements, then unique_ptr is the first stop. –  Puppy Feb 23 '12 at 0:09
    
And that is the automatism that I'm objecting to. There is no general rule; it all depends on the type, and what you are doing with it. And why you are allocating dynamically. (I've had a number of cases where I just ignore the pointer returned from new, for example. Having said that, I'll admit that unique_ptr, or auto_ptr if can't guarantee an ultra-new compiler, is a good solution in a lot of cases.) –  James Kanze Feb 23 '12 at 9:00

"Dynamically allocate a student and then prompts the user for student’s first name, a last name, and A - number(ID number). "

This assignment requires you to have a not completely initialized Student object around until you can update it with the information provided by the user. That is a very bad idea in general, because the mere possibility of having a not completely initialized object (e.g. in this case lacking a proper id value) makes the code using that object more complex because it has to check whether, for example, there is a proper id value. And that complexity for proper use, plus failures to recognize that the complexity is needed for proper use, attracts bugs like mad – ungood.

That is why C++, extending C, provided a very strong coupling between allocation and initialization. With a C++ new expression you get either both a successful allocation and a successful complete initialization, or else neither (it cleans up on failure). That is what the question should better teach!

So instead of the given question quoted above, I'm going to teach you acceptable C++ practice (although using new is generally to be avoided), which means answering this modified question:

Prompt the user for student’s first name, a last name, and A - number(ID number), and then dynamically allocate a Student object with these values.

OK, here goes:

// The Dynamic Student, version 1.
// "Prompt the user for student’s first name, a last name, and A - number
// (ID), and then dynamically allocate a `Student` object with these values."

#include <assert.h>         // assert
#include <iostream>         // std::cout,std::endl
#include <string>           // std::string
#include <sstream>          // std::istringstream
#include <stdexcept>        // std::exception, std::runtime_error
#include <stdlib.h>         // EXIT_SUCCESS, EXIT_FAILURE

#define CPP_NO_COPYING_OF( Clazz )      \
    Clazz( Clazz const& );              \
    Clazz& operator=( Clazz const& )

namespace cpp {
    using namespace std;

    bool hopefully( bool const c ) { return c; }
    bool throwX( string const& s ) { throw runtime_error( s ); }

    string lineFromInput()
    {
        string result;
        getline( cin, result )
            || throwX( "lineFromInput: std::getline failed (EOF?)" );
        return result;
    }

    string lineFromInput( string const& prompt )
    {
        cout << prompt;
        return lineFromInput();
    }

    int intFromInput( string const& prompt )
    {
        istringstream   stream( lineFromInput( prompt ) );
        int             result;

        stream >> result
            || throwX( "intFromInput: input line was not a valid number spec" );
        return result;
    }
}  // namespace cpp

namespace blah {
    using namespace std;
    using namespace cpp;

    struct Student
    {
        CPP_NO_COPYING_OF( Student );

        int const       id;
        string const    firstName;
        string const    lastName;

        Student(
            int const       _id,
            string const    _firstName,
            string const    _lastName
            )
            : id( _id ), firstName( _firstName ), lastName( _lastName )
        {}
    };

    Student* studentFromInput()
    {
        cout << "It's -- the Dynamic Student program!" << endl;

        string const    firstName   = lineFromInput( "First name, please? " );
        hopefully( firstName != "" )
            || throwX( "Sorry, the first name can't be nothing." );

        string const    lastName    = lineFromInput( "Last name, please? " );
        hopefully( lastName != "" )
            || throwX( "Sorry, the last name can't be nothing." );

        int const       id          = intFromInput( "And the student id is...? " );
        hopefully( id > 0 )
            || throwX( "Sorry, the id can't be negative or zero." );

        return new Student( id, firstName, lastName );
    }
}  // namespace blah

void cppMain()
{
    using namespace blah;

    Student const* const    pStudent    = studentFromInput();

    try
    {
        // Use the student object, e.g.
        cout
            << "The student is "
            << pStudent->firstName << " " << pStudent->lastName
            << ", with id " << pStudent->id << "."
            << endl;
        // Then:
        delete pStudent;
    }
    catch( std::exception const& )
    {
        delete pStudent;
        throw;      // Rethrows the exception.
    }
}

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    try
    {
        cppMain();
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    catch( exception const& x )
    {
        cerr << "!" << x.what() << endl;
    }
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

For each executed new expression (which does allocation and initialization) there should ideally be a corresponding execution of a delete expression, which cleans up and deallocates the memory block so that it can be reused. And the delete expression should ideally be executed even if something fails and throws an exception. Hence the try and catch.

However, coding it like that is error prone and verbose.

Instead, in more idiomatic C++ programming one will use a smart pointer, an object that holds a pointer and provides pointer operations (so it looks like it is a pointer), and whose destructor automatically executes a delete expression when the pointer is no longer used. The C++ standard library has several such smart pointer classes. As a general rule, use the most restrictive smart pointer that you can, because it has least overhead and will most likely support conversion to more general smart pointers, while the opposite is much less likely, downright unlikely.

So in this case, you can use e.g. C++11 std::unique_ptr or if your compiler is old, C++03 std::auto_ptr, both from the <memory> header:

// The Dynamic Student, version 2  --  using smart pointer.
// "Prompt the user for student’s first name, a last name, and A - number
// (ID), and then dynamically allocate a `Student` object with these values."

#include <assert.h>         // assert
#include <iostream>         // std::cout,std::endl
#include <memory>           // std::unique_ptr
#include <string>           // std::string
#include <sstream>          // std::istringstream
#include <stdexcept>        // std::exception, std::runtime_error
#include <stdlib.h>         // EXIT_SUCCESS, EXIT_FAILURE

#define CPP_NO_COPYING_OF( Clazz )      \
    Clazz( Clazz const& );              \
    Clazz& operator=( Clazz const& )

namespace cpp {
    using namespace std;

    bool hopefully( bool const c ) { return c; }
    bool throwX( string const& s ) { throw runtime_error( s ); }

    string lineFromInput()
    {
        string result;
        getline( cin, result )
            || throwX( "lineFromInput: std::getline failed (EOF?)" );
        return result;
    }

    string lineFromInput( string const& prompt )
    {
        cout << prompt;
        return lineFromInput();
    }

    int intFromInput( string const& prompt )
    {
        istringstream   stream( lineFromInput( prompt ) );
        int             result;

        stream >> result
            || throwX( "intFromInput: input line was not a valid number spec" );
        return result;
    }
}  // namespace cpp

namespace blah {
    using namespace std;
    using namespace cpp;

    struct Student
    {
        CPP_NO_COPYING_OF( Student );

        int const       id;
        string const    firstName;
        string const    lastName;

        Student(
            int const       _id,
            string const    _firstName,
            string const    _lastName
            )
            : id( _id ), firstName( _firstName ), lastName( _lastName )
        {}
    };

    unique_ptr<Student> studentFromInput()
    {
        cout << "It's -- the Dynamic Student program!" << endl;

        string const    firstName   = lineFromInput( "First name, please? " );
        hopefully( firstName != "" )
            || throwX( "Sorry, the first name can't be nothing." );

        string const    lastName    = lineFromInput( "Last name, please? " );
        hopefully( lastName != "" )
            || throwX( "Sorry, the last name can't be nothing." );

        int const       id          = intFromInput( "And the student id is...? " );
        hopefully( id > 0 )
            || throwX( "Sorry, the id can't be negative or zero." );

        return unique_ptr<Student>( new Student( id, firstName, lastName ) );
    }
}  // namespace blah

void cppMain()
{
    using namespace blah;

    unique_ptr<Student> const   pStudent    = studentFromInput();

    // Use the student object, e.g.
    cout
        << "The student is "
        << pStudent->firstName << " " << pStudent->lastName
        << ", with id " << pStudent->id << "."
        << endl;
}

int main()
{
    using namespace std;

    try
    {
        cppMain();
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    catch( exception const& x )
    {
        cerr << "!" << x.what() << endl;
    }
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

But, except for the assignment's requirement to use dynamic allocation, a program with the functionality above would be written without any dynamic allocation or smart pointers. The studentFromInput function would just return a Student object by value, copying. It is almost a paradox, but modern C++ is very heavily based on copying, and still yields pretty fast programs!

Of course, under the hood there are a large number of dirty tricks to avoid that the copying actually happens in the machine code.

share|improve this answer
    
@anonymous downvoter: please explain your downvote so that others can benefit from your insight and not be led astray by the error(s) you spotted. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 22 '12 at 16:40
    
@Alf: I downvoted it, and I think it was a mistake. Not entirely sure why, but if you could edit your answer than I could reverse the downvote. –  Puppy Feb 23 '12 at 2:14
    
@DeadMG: done . –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 23 '12 at 2:37
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Wow that is an answer, I like how it completes the task and is still unsubmitable as a homework answer. Not best I have seen but good, best was "This should work on x86" int main(){asm {...}}" –  r_ahlskog Feb 23 '12 at 14:42

struct goes before the name of the structure it defines. :)

What is the error you're seeing when you try new Student? Why doesn't it work?

share|improve this answer

The new statement returns a pointer to the newed instance. So you need to defined the student1 as a pointer.

struct Student * student1 = new Student;
share|improve this answer

new returns a pointer to an object... so you'd want

struct Student* student1 = new Student;
share|improve this answer

Why are you using new? Just declare an instance of the variable:

Student student1;

Given the definition of Student, it doesn't look like it has identity, and it is certainly copyable, so you should probably never new it.

(I'd also provide it with a constructor, so that it can be initialized correctly from the moment it is defined.)

share|improve this answer
    
It is specifically stated to do so within the instructions of my assignment... I don't even know what a constructor is yet. –  sircrisp Feb 22 '12 at 15:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.