Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

System.out.println(Integer.MAX_VALUE + 1 == Integer.MIN_VALUE);

is true.

I understand that integer in Java is 32 bit and can't go above 2^31-1, but I can't understand why adding 1 to its MAX_VALUE results in MIN_VALUE and not in some kind of exception. Not mentioning something like transparent conversion to a bigger type, like Ruby does.

Is this behavior specified somewhere? Can I rely on it?

share|improve this question
    
plenty of good answers here now, however I'm now curious about why you ask "Can I rely on it?" - why would you want to rely on it? –  Brian Feb 22 '12 at 15:30
    
it could be another question, --- I was looking for some 'iterator' that would iterate an array starting from element N, then after reaching the end element start iterating from element 0 to element N-1 --- and this Integer behavior could be useful for that... but i ended up with just two different loops –  Oleg Mikheev Feb 22 '12 at 15:51
2  
For reference, if you want to get an exception instead, some libraries provide methods: Guava Apache –  Louis Wasserman Feb 22 '12 at 18:53

8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Because the integer overflows. When it overflows, the next value is Integer.MIN_VALUE. Relevant JLS

If an integer addition overflows, then the result is the low-order bits of the mathematical sum as represented in some sufficiently large two's-complement format. If overflow occurs, then the sign of the result is not the same as the sign of the mathematical sum of the two operand values.

share|improve this answer
    
where is that specified? –  Oleg Mikheev Feb 22 '12 at 15:17
    
added a quote.. –  Bozho Feb 22 '12 at 15:19
    
thanks that's what I was looking for –  Oleg Mikheev Feb 22 '12 at 15:22

The integer storage gets overflowed and that does not throw any exception:

The built-in integer operators do not indicate overflow or underflow in any way. The only numeric operators that can throw an exception (§11) are the integer divide operator / (§15.17.2) and the integer remainder operator % (§15.17.3), which throw an ArithmeticException if the right-hand operand is zero.

Sample in a 4-bits storage:

MAX_INT: 0111 (7)
MIN_INT: 1000 (-8)

MAX_INT + 1:

 0111+
 0001
 ----
 1000
share|improve this answer
    
0000 is just 0; you are maybe forgetting the MIN INT is a large negative? –  Brian Feb 22 '12 at 15:23
    
thanks, @Brian, corrected it, Also, added a link with sun spec. –  falsarella Feb 22 '12 at 15:27
    
in that case, have a +1 :-) –  Brian Feb 22 '12 at 15:28

I believe that this link explains what you are seeing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two's_complement

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for first good, useful, correct answer I've seen yet –  Brian Feb 22 '12 at 15:22

The same reason why the date changes when you cross the international date line: there's a discontinuity there. It's built into the nature of binary addition.

share|improve this answer

You must understand how integer values are represented in binary form, and how binary addition works. Java uses a representation called two's complement, in which the first bit of the number represents its sign. Whenever you add 1 to the largest java Integer, which has a bit sign of 0, then its bit sign becomes 1 and the number becomes negative.

This links explains with more details: http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/~rebelsky/Espresso/Readings/binary.html#integers-in-java

--

The Java Language Specification treats this behavior here: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/expressions.html#15.18

If an integer addition overflows, then the result is the low-order bits of the mathematical sum as represented in some sufficiently large two's-complement format. If overflow occurs, then the sign of the result is not the same as the sign of the mathematical sum of the two operand values.

Which means that you can rely on this behavior.

share|improve this answer

This is a well known issue related to the fact that Integers are represented as two's complement down at the binary layer. When you add 1 to the max value of a two's complement number you get the min value. Honestly, all integers behaved this way before java existed, and changing this behavior for the Java language would have added more overhead to integer math, and confused programmers coming from other languages.

share|improve this answer

When you add 3 (in binary 11) to 1 (in binary 1), you must change to 0 (in binary 0) all binary 1 starting from the right, until you got 0, which you should change to 1. Integer.MAX_VALUE has all places filled up with 1 so there remain only 0s.

share|improve this answer

On most processors, the arithmetic instructions have no mode to fault on an overflow. They set a flag that must be checked. That's an extra instruction so probably slower. In order for the language implementations to be as fast as possible, the languages are frequently specified to ignore the error and continue. For Java the behaviour is specified in the JLS. For C, the language does not specify the behaviour, but modern processors will behave as Java.

I believe there are proposals for (awkward) Java SE 8 libraries to throw on overflow, as well as unsigned operations. A behaviour, I believe popular in the DSP world, is clamp the values at the maximums, so Integer.MAX_VALUE + 1 == Integer.MAX_VALUE [not Java].

I'm sure future languages will use arbitrary precision ints, but not for a while yet. Requires more expensive compiler design to run quickly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.