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I have a problem regarding the name resolution of a type called Action. While the project was in an early state and everything was declared in the same project the compiler always preferred my own class. However since it has become necessary to separate the project into different assemblies (i.e. ProjectName.Common, ProjectName.Engine, etc.) a naming conflict between System.Action and ProjectName.Common.Action arised.

I found out that I can explicitly import the project internal namespace inside of the namespace declaration of any project file, while System is still imported in the global scope as initially created by the IDE. In fact this works but does not look very elegant. Is there a better approach to solve this problem? Renaming my Action class is not really an acceptable solution, since it is quite a common domain-name and not anything special like i.e. Math etc.

Code Example:

using System;
...

namespace ProjectName.Engine {

    using ProjectName.Common;

    class SomeClass {

        private Action action;
        ...

    }

}

Maybe someone knows a recipe for those kind of naming conflicts ...

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You could rename your type to Operation. –  ChaosPandion Feb 22 '12 at 15:20
    
@ChaosPandion: Unfortunately that was exactly the one thing which is rather unacceptable (at least for me) ;-) –  agent_harris Feb 22 '12 at 18:00
    
Thank you all for your answers, all of them are quite equally helpful. However, while most technical issues were relatively clear for me in advance, I think sometimes I am just looking for the "best aesthetic" solution. –  agent_harris Feb 22 '12 at 18:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consider placing your Action class in the root ProjectName namespace instead of ProjectName.Common. If you do that, then inside the ProjectName namespace or any subnamespace, Action will refer to ProjectName.Action instead of System.Action, and you won't have to add using directives to all your other source files.

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I really like that idea. Remembers me to these guidelines which recommend that only deeper namespaces should depend on upper namespaces. I just forgot that this can or should also apply to different assemblies within the same project scope. So for that case I think it is the best answer for my actual problem. Thank you! –  agent_harris Feb 22 '12 at 17:58

You can use a namespace alias:

using Example = ProjectName.Common;

class SomeClass {

    private Example.Action action;
    ...

}

Or alternatively, a type alias for the Action type only:

using Act = ProjectName.Common.Action;

class SomeClass {

    private Act action;
    ...

}
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You can use using with an alias:

using Common = ProjectName.Common;

Then refer to System.Action as simply Action, and your action as Common.Action. If you're okay with changing the name a little in only certain parts:

using CAction = ProjectName.Common.Action

And you can use CAction and Action as necessary.

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You can use an alias instead of having to specify the full namespace:

using CommonAction = ProjectName.Common.Action;
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You can distinguish between your Action and system Action by doing this

using MyAction = Project.Common.Action

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What you've done is an appropriate way to handle this issue. You may also use an alias to give a temporary name, or to give the compiler a hint as to which one you prefer. This saves you the trouble of preferring all types in ProjectName.Common over System.

    using System;
    using ProjectName.Common
    ...

    namespace ProjectName.Engine {

        using Action = ProjectName.Common.Action;

        class SomeClass {

            private Action action;
            ...

        }

   }
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I would suggest making your cast explicit anyway. Anytime you have ambiguous references this should be done, and especially in the case of having the same names as in System. Otherwise, you are asking for confusion from any new programmer who has to come in and maintain the code. The new programmer will see Action and assume the System version if it is not explicitly built out. While this is more verbose, it expresses the code and its intent in a clear fashion. That is just my two cents though. You can accomplish this the same way using aliases as others have suggested.

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try using Action = ProjectName.Common.Action;

You'll need to specify this in each code file that needs to reference that class, and if that code file also needs to use the System.Action delegate, then you can just fully-qualify it in your code as "System.Action".

You can, of course, also give an alias to the System.Action delegate, but I would find it less confusing to just use the fully-qualified name.

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