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I'm reading the Pro ASP.NET MVC3 Framework book from Freeman and Sanderson and have a question about some of the code. This might be a newbie question but I have found people's questions regarding the examples in this book to be useful.

The Cart controller in the SportsStore example marks the Checkout action as HttpPost but neither the AddToCart nor RemoveFromCart actions are marked as HttpPost. But they both receive form submissions and modify the underlying Cart model. Isn't that the definition of when to use HttpPost?

Granted, the model changes aren't being persisted in a database in this example but that's only for simplicity sake. The model is being changed just as much in the AddToCart and RemoveFromCart actions as the Checkout action.

btw - The code works just the same with or without HttpPost. So this is mostly a question about best practices.

Below is the final controller class from the book:

namespace SportsStore.WebUI.Controllers
{
    public class CartController : Controller
    {
        private IProductRepository repository;
        private IOrderProcessor orderProcessor;

        public CartController(IProductRepository repo, IOrderProcessor proc)
        {
            repository = repo;
            orderProcessor = proc;
        }

        public RedirectToRouteResult AddToCart(Cart cart, int productID, string returnUrl) {
            Product product = repository.Products
                .FirstOrDefault(p => p.ProductID == productID);

            if (product != null) {
                cart.AddItem(product, 1);
            }
            return RedirectToAction("Index", new {returnUrl});
        }


        public RedirectToRouteResult RemoveFromCart(Cart cart, int productId, string returnUrl)
        {
            Product product = repository.Products
                .FirstOrDefault(p => p.ProductID == productId);

            if (product != null)
            {
                cart.RemoveLine(product);
            }
            return RedirectToAction("Index", new { returnUrl });
        }

        public ViewResult Index(Cart cart, string returnUrl)
        {
            return View(new CartIndexViewModel
            {
                Cart = cart,
                ReturnUrl = returnUrl
            });
        }

        public ViewResult Summary(Cart cart)
        {
            return View(cart);
        }

        [HttpPost]
        public ViewResult Checkout(Cart cart, ShippingDetails shippingDetails)
        {
            if (cart.Lines.Count() == 0)
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("", "Sorry your cart is empty");
            }

            if (ModelState.IsValid)
            {
                orderProcessor.ProcessOrder(cart, shippingDetails);
                cart.Clear();
                return View("Completed");
            }
            else
            {
                return View(shippingDetails);
            }
        }

        public ViewResult Checkout()
        {
            return View(new ShippingDetails());
        }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I recall from the book, Sanderson & pal use a special ModelBinder to access a Session-based Cart object... isn't that right?

Technically the implementation in the book isn't incorrect, since the actions do not affect the underlying application. Session-based storage is volatile, so the actions to not represent a permanent change.

A real application might use idempotent HttpPut and HttpDelete (or non-idempotent HttpPost) for the add/remove cart item actions. However a real application would probably not keep these things in volatile session storage.

I think the book is just trying to show you examples of an application without creating a ton of storage tables.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the Cart is stored as a session object. But if that Cart object was eventually saved to a database table, these functions should be HttpPost, correct? –  Stickchecked Feb 22 '12 at 16:41
    
Absolutely. Or, if you can make the actions idempotent, you could use HttpPut for add to cart, and HttpDelete for remove from cart. But if your actions are not idempotent, use HttpPost. –  danludwig Feb 22 '12 at 17:06
    
Thanks for introducing me to the word idempotent. :) –  Stickchecked Feb 22 '12 at 17:24
    
YW. It should definitely be in your vocabulary when talking about HTTP verbs. –  danludwig Feb 22 '12 at 17:43

I believe that the checkout ActionResult in your code is decorated with [HttpPost] as there is also an Action that is available within the CartController that is defaulted to HttpGet

    public ViewResult Checkout()
    {
        return View(new ShippingDetails());
    }

also AddToCart nor RemoveFromCart actions are not marked as HttpPost as they would not be available through HttpGet due to the modelbinding.

share|improve this answer
    
The question isn't about the two Checkout actions, it's about the AddToCart and RemoveFromCart actions. –  Stickchecked Feb 22 '12 at 16:36
    
You mentioned in your question - The Cart controller in the SportsStore example marks the Checkout action as HttpPost but neither the AddToCart nor RemoveFromCart actions are marked as HttpPost –  Nicholas Murray Feb 22 '12 at 16:38

In my limited experience, I would say that they should be marked as [HttpPost] for the sake of consistency. In other examples in the book there are situations where 2 action methods have the same name e.g.

public ActionResult Edit(intId)
{
...
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(EditViewModel model)
{
...
}

So marking the HttpPost method as such will allow easy naming of methods. In the example you give there is only 1 AddToCart mehod so there was probably no need to differentiate.

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