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namespace MyNameSpace
{
    static class MyClass
    {
        static MyClass()
        {
            //Authentication process.. User needs to enter password
        }

        public static void MyMethod()
        {
            //Depends on successful completion of constructor
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass.MyMethod();
        }
    }
}

Here is the sequence which I assumed

  1. Start of static constructor
  2. End of static constructor
  3. Start of main
  4. Start of MyMethod
  5. End of main

Now in any scenario if 4 will start before 2 I am screwed. Is it possible?

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8  
Is this a java or c# question ? You've put both tags, and I don't think the specification is the same in the two languages. –  ARRG Feb 22 '12 at 16:13
    
In my openion this is work same for both.. But I am C# guy.. Sry for that –  QuiteNothing Feb 22 '12 at 16:15
4  
Java doesn't have a static constructor in the same way, just static blocks for static initialization. static { //do something... } –  deraj Feb 22 '12 at 16:20
2  
Personally, I feel uncomfortable with any form of interactivity inside a static constructor. I understand your goal (make every method in this static class wait until the user is authorized before allowing it to run), but really dislike this method of accomplishing it. –  Brian Feb 22 '12 at 18:11
    
@Brian:- Yeah... You are right... I was just doing analysis.. Finally I just decided not to use constructor but Initialize method –  QuiteNothing Mar 8 '12 at 17:44

10 Answers 10

up vote 193 down vote accepted

You only asked one question here but there are a dozen or so questions that you should have asked, so I'll answer them all.

Here is the sequence which I assumed

  1. Start of class constructor (also known as cctor)
  2. End of cctor
  3. start of Main
  4. start of MyMethod

Is this correct?

No. The correct sequence is:

  1. Start of cctor for Program, if there is one. There is not.
  2. End of cctor for Program, if there is one. There is not.
  3. Start of Main
  4. Start of cctor for MyClass
  5. End of cctor for MyClass
  6. Start of MyClass.MyMethod

What if there is a static field initializer?

The CLR is permitted to change the order in which static field initializers run in some cases. See Jon's page on the subject for details:

The differences between static constructors and type initializers

Is it ever possible for a static method like MyMethod to be called before the cctor of that class completes?

Yes. If the cctor itself calls MyMethod then obviously MyMethod will be called before the cctor completes.

The cctor does not call MyMethod. Is it ever possible for a static method like MyMethod to be called before the cctor of MyClass completes?

Yes. If the cctor uses another type whose cctor calls MyMethod then MyMethod will be called before the MyClass cctor completes.

No cctors call MyMethod, directly or indirectly! Now is it ever possible for a static method like MyMethod to be called before the cctor of MyClass completes?

No.

Is that still true even if there are multiple threads involved?

Yes. The cctor will finish on one thread before the static method can be called on any thread.

Can the cctor be called more than once? Suppose two threads both cause the cctor to be run.

The cctor is guaranteed to be called at most once, no matter how many threads are involved. If two threads call MyMethod "at the same time" then they race. One of them loses the race and blocks until the MyClass cctor completes on the winning thread.

The losing thread blocks until the cctor is done? Really?

Really.

So what if the cctor on the winning thread calls code that blocks on a lock previously taken by the losing thread?

Then you have a classic lock order inversion condition. Your program deadlocks. Forever.

That seems dangerous. How can I avoid the deadlock?

If it hurts when you do that then stop doing that. Never do something that can block in a cctor.

Is it a good idea to rely upon cctor initialization semantics to enforce complex security requirements? And is it a good idea to have a cctor that does user interactions?

Neither are good ideas. My advice is that you should find a different way to ensure that the security-impacting preconditions of your methods are met.

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41  
Deliciously thorough as always, Eric. –  James Michael Hare Feb 22 '12 at 17:32
3  
Eric, I am curious why you replaced "static constructor" with "class constructor" or "cctor" in this answer. Is it improper to use "static constructor" when referring to a cctor? –  phoog Feb 22 '12 at 21:23
3  
my C# knowledge is bare minimum, but I have enjoyed reading this answer :) –  Maggie Feb 22 '12 at 21:51
5  
@phoog: I wanted to be consistent in my use of terminology, so I picked the shortest one. "Static constructor" and "class constructor" are both fine. As an implementation detail, the static constructor of a type is emitted as a special method called ".cctor", so it is common to refer to such a constructor as "a cctor". Were I writing in a more formal context I'd use one of the longer terms. –  Eric Lippert Feb 22 '12 at 22:39
2  
+1 for the mind reading abilities. This was truly enlightening. –  Alpha Feb 28 '12 at 17:51

The #3 is actually #1: static initialization does not start until the first use of the class to which it belongs.

It is possible if MyMethod is called from the static constructor or a static initialization block. If you do not invoke MyMethod directly or indirectly from your static constructor, you should be fine.

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Just as a note, it's my understanding that the static initialization can actually be called before first use depending on eligibility for optimizations. –  James Michael Hare Feb 22 '12 at 16:18
    
1  
For a static constructor, true, but for static initialization was my point. Sorry, maybe I was just picking nits on the phrase 'static initialization does not start...' that's true for static construction, but not if the class doesn't have a static constructor, then static initialization may happen before. –  James Michael Hare Feb 22 '12 at 16:28
    
Sorry, I'm probably just overanalyzing the verbiage. In the context of the question it's absolutely correct, I was just worried about that sentence as a stand-alone statement for static initialization in the context of classes without explicit static constructors. –  James Michael Hare Feb 22 '12 at 16:31
    
@James: You're not overanalysing - the terminology is the crucial difference here. Static constructors are a C# concept, whereas type initialisation is a .NET thing. The code inside a static constructor (C#) becomes part of the type initialiser (.NET), but when and how the type initialiser triggers (ie, the beforefieldinit semantics) is determined by whether or not the C# class has a static constructor. –  LukeH Feb 22 '12 at 16:36

According to the MSDN, a static constructor:

A static constructor is called automatically to initialize the class before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced.

So the static constructor will be called before the static method MyClass.MyMethod() is invoked (assuming not also invoked during static construction or static field initialization of course).

Now, if you are doing anything asynchronous in that static constructor, then it's your job to synchronize that.

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5  
If you are doing anything asynchronous that involves a second thread in a static constructor, you are in for a world of pain. Nothing makes deadlocks faster. See stackoverflow.com/a/8883117/88656 for an example. –  Eric Lippert Feb 22 '12 at 16:41
    
@Eric: agreed... I wouldn't want to do that, but wasn't sure form his example what exactly he was wanting to be finished by the time MyMethod was called... –  James Michael Hare Feb 22 '12 at 16:50

From the documentation (emphasis mine):

A static constructor is called automatically to initialize the class before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced.

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You can guarantee 4 will always come after 2 (if you don't create a instance of your class from your static method), however the same is not true for 1 and 3.

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The static constructor will be called before mymethod is executed. However if you are screwed if 4 is called before 2 then I suggest you re-think your design. Should not be doing complicated stuff in a static constructor anyway.

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The CLR guarantees that the static constructor runs before any static members are accessed. However, your design is a bit smelly. It would be more straightforward to do something like this:

static void Main(string[] args) 
{ 
     bool userIsAuthenticated = MyClass.AuthenticateUser();
     if (userIsAuthenticated)
         MyClass.MyMethod(); 
 } 

With your design, if authentication fails, the only way to prevent MyMethod from running is by throwing an exception.

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It's ensured that a static class's constructor has been called before any of its methods get executed. Example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Press enter");
        Console.ReadLine();
        Boop.SayHi();
        Boop.SayHi();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

}

static class Boop
{
    static Boop()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hi incoming ...");
    }

    public static void SayHi()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hi there!");
    }
}

Output:

Press enter

// after pressing enter

Hi incoming ...

Hi there!

Hi there!

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using System; namespace MyNameSpace { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { Console.WriteLine("Entered in main"); Boop.SayHi(); Boop.SayHi(); } } static class Boop { static Boop() { Console.Read(); Console.WriteLine("Constructor key entered"); } public static void SayHi() { Console.WriteLine("Method is called"); } } } yeah this program gives better understanding –  QuiteNothing Feb 22 '12 at 16:26
    
Possibly. Next time post it as an answer, though. It's more helpful and visible then. –  haiyyu Feb 22 '12 at 16:29
    
Yeah I am new so learning. Thanks –  QuiteNothing Feb 22 '12 at 16:35

Or you could step through in the debugger.

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Yes i was sure about happy path.. I wanted to know each and every condition... –  QuiteNothing Feb 29 '12 at 19:51

The actual order:

  1. Start of main
  2. Start of static constructor
  3. End of static constructor
  4. Start of MyMethod
  5. End of main
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