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I've managed to improve a web aplication performance to be 10% faster than it used to be. With this, I've noticed that memory usage has doubled!!!

The test application does: call a web service, do some complicated business action * [number of users] * [number of times]

I check my change code, but nothing was suspicious of using more memory..(all i did is remove lines of code that serialized a DataSet into byte[] and saved this in cache) I checked again and again in a multithreaded test:

  1. As I skipped more and more code (perfomance improved - memory went up)
  2. As I repeated bad code in a loop (perfomance was bad- memory went down)

Can any one explain why????

Code below:

Before: (Cycle Time : 100% Memory 100%)

            outStream = new MemoryStream();
            new BinaryFormatter().Serialize(outStream, stateData); 
            outStream.Close();
            SessionSettings.StateData_Set(stateId, outStream.ToArray());
            outStream.Dispose();

After option 1: (Cycle Time: 200% Memory 50%)

for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
            {
                outStream = new MemoryStream();
                new BinaryFormatter().Serialize(outStream, stateData); 
            }
            outStream.Close();
            SessionSettings.StateData_Set(stateId, outStream.ToArray());
            outStream.Dispose();

After option 2: (Cycle Time: 90% Memory 200%)

                //outStream = new MemoryStream();
                //new BinaryFormatter().Serialize(outStream, stateData); 
            //outStream.Close();
            SessionSettings.StateData_Set(stateId, null);
            //outStream.Dispose();

SessionSettings.StateData_Set puts an object into a

dictionary<string,dictionary<string, object>>

which means

<Sessions<DataKey,DataObject>>

in the end of each cycle the inner dictionary removes the entry and in the end of each user session the entire inner dictionary is removed from the outer dictionary.

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1  
Please clarify. You removed code that serialized, replacing it with code that saves in a cache? Or, you removed code that both serialized and cached the data? –  Kevin Hsu Feb 22 '12 at 17:16
1  
Could you give some insights, how did you measure the memory usage? And did you take the GC (Performance Counter -> Time in GC) into account as well? –  Haymo Kutschbach Feb 22 '12 at 17:25
    
I removed code that serialized and code that put this serialized values into cache. –  user355289 Feb 23 '12 at 20:08
    
I didn't use performance counter yet. I used stopwatch on the client side to measure average response time, and watched task manager memory usage for w3wp on server. –  user355289 Feb 23 '12 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Another guess: if your application allocates too much memory (possibly by frequent serializing) the CLR will trigger a GC much more often. By watching the Performance Counter -> Time in GC you will notice, the GC eats up a lot of CPU - I have seen scenarios high above 40%. This is especially true, if your datasets are large and the byte[] storage ends up on the LOH.

By limiting those allocations the GC will get triggered far less often, causing a better application performance. A reason for the observed increase in memory could be that the managed heap now works more in a healthy region.

In order to find more reliably explanation, please post some performance counter measures: before your optimization and after your optimizations. Interesting would be: overall heap size, time spend in GC.

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there may be something in what you're saying, while memory is higher CPU is going up and down around 50%, compared to the constant 95% that was before. so maybe it is GC working harder... –  user355289 Feb 25 '12 at 11:24
    
I couldn't find an official reference yet, but for .NET 4.0 it seems, the GC runs in some kind of stress mode, if too many allocations of large objects are made. This is, it collects basically all the time and not only if the managed heap is 'full'. This suggests a smaller memory footprint for the much higher cost of a permanent (gen 2!) collection. –  Haymo Kutschbach Feb 25 '12 at 12:13
    
I think you are right. as the code gets better - time spent in GC becomes shorter and gen2 heap size grows dramtically –  user355289 Feb 26 '12 at 16:01
    
Thanks. I am glad you found the reason. A large gen2 heap is not dramatic per se. If it behaves peacefull it does not neccessarily hurt performance. But a steady running GC for sure does hurt. For heavy allocation scenarios, I always try to not to rely on the GC, but it is good to know, the GC is in the back as fallback. –  Haymo Kutschbach Feb 26 '12 at 16:08

Since you didn't provide any code and only a brief explanation it's more of a riddle than a question.

So, perhaps the CACHED DATASET was being accessed by 10 users at roughly the same time. The CACHED DATASET was being locked and viewed by the users SYNCHRONOUSLY (one at a time). This would perform poorly in a multi-threaded test but would use little memory.

Perhaps the REPLICATED DATASET (uncached) was being accessed by 10 users at roughly the same time. Each user would have their own copy of the REPLICATED DATASET. With no locking/synchronized access and multiple copies of the DATASET the memory would increase but the performance would improve.

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I added more code –  user355289 Feb 23 '12 at 19:20

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