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I want to create an array containing values from 0 to 1 with interval of 0.1. I can use:

float[] myArray = new float[10];
float increment = 0.1;
for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
   myArray[i] = increment;
   increment += 0.1;
}

I was wondering whether there is a function like Enumerable.Range that permits to specify also the increment interval.

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5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

An interesting fact is that every answer posted so far has fixed the bug in your proposed code, but only one has called out that they've done so.

Binary floating point numbers have representation error when dealing with any quantity that is not a fraction of an exact power of two. ("3.0/4.0" is a representable fraction because the bottom is a power of two; "1.0/10.0" is not.)

Therefore, when you say:

for(i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
{
    myArray[i] = increment;    
    increment += 0.1; 
} 

You are not actually incrementing "increment" by 1.0/10.0. You are incrementing it by the closest representable fraction that has an exact power of two on the bottom. So in fact this is equivalent to:

for(i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
{
    myArray[i] = increment;    
    increment += (exactly_one_tenth + small_representation_error);
} 

So, what is the value of the tenth increment? Clearly it is 10 * (exactly_one_tenth + small_representation_error) which is obviously equal to exactly_one + 10 * small_representation_error. You have multiplied the size of the representation error by ten.

Any time you repeatedly add together two floating point numbers, each subsequent addition increases the total representation error of the sum slightly and that adds up, literally, to a potentially large error. In some cases where you are summing thousands or millions of small numbers the error can become far larger than the actual total.

The far better solution is to do what everyone else has done. Recompute the fraction from integers every time. That way each result gets its own small representation error; it does not accumulate the representation errors of previously computed results.

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"which is obviously equal to" that's actually not that obvious, since the distributive law isn't valid on floating points. –  CodesInChaos Feb 22 '12 at 22:01
    
I would like to thank everybody for the several great solution proposed. I give the answer to you because yours got the most votes and for the numerical analysis lesson. –  CiccioMiami Feb 22 '12 at 22:12
1  
@CodeInChaos but exactly_one_tenth and small_representation_error are not floating point values; they're pseudocode mathematically-pure variables which, when summed, give the actual value of 0.1f. –  phoog Feb 22 '12 at 22:13
1  
@CodeInChaos: Indeed; more specifically, the final result need not be exactly off by ten times the representation error. It could be off by more or less than that amount. It was not my intent to give a strict bound on the error, but rather to give the reader the valuable intuition that the difference between the represented value and the desired exact mathematical value is potentially getting larger every time a subsequent addition is made. –  Eric Lippert Feb 22 '12 at 22:37
1  
Technically the small_representation_error is exact and constant, but the addition introduces further rounding errors, and those are not necessarily constant. Which means 0.1f+... is not exactly 10*0.1f, so yes, I was careless, and complained about the wrong part of the calculation. –  CodesInChaos Feb 23 '12 at 9:03
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Ugly, but...

Enumerable.Range(0,10).Select(i => i/10.0).ToArray();
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Tnx for the edit –  Chris Shain Feb 22 '12 at 16:32
1  
At least it works! You can always hide code in #Region ;) –  PeekaySwitch Feb 22 '12 at 16:33
    
That first 0 should be a 1 though :P –  Botz3000 Feb 22 '12 at 16:35
    
@Botz3000 why? OP asked for "an array containing values from 0 to 1" –  Chris Shain Feb 22 '12 at 16:36
    
according to his code snippet starting from 0.1. But if not, the 10 should be a 11. just felt like nitpicking :) –  Botz3000 Feb 22 '12 at 16:38
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Here is one way:

Enumerable.Range(1,10).Select(i => i /10.0)
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No, there's no enumerable range that allows you to do that, but you could always divide by 10:

foreach (int i in Enumerable.Range(0, 10))
    array[i] = (i + 1) / 10.0f

Note that this avoids the error that will accumulate if you repeatedly sum 0.1f. For example, if you sum the 10 elements in the myArray in your sample code, you get a value that's closer to 5.50000048 than 5.5.

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Well you could use this:

Enumerable.Range(1,10).Select(x => x / 10.0).ToArray()

Not sure if that's better though.

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