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For years I've noticed GNU's grep in Unixes (not just Linux flavors) detected that I was using a color-capable TERM interactively like xterm/gnome-terminal/kconsole, and nicely colored my search expressions among the context.

What might be a simple cli tool that only boldens/highlights your regex or simple search string, but unlike grep, doesn't otherwise filter out any lines? Maybe a sed trick can do this, which I can alias and later pipe commands to?

EXAMPLE

So I wrote a program pricehist.sh which normally produces CSV-like data for another program, but I frequently visually inspect it like so:

./pricehist.sh mostalexp-GPW  28 |sort -r -g -k 3 -t ' ' |column -t -s", "
MOSTALEXP,20120222,0.78,0.79,0.76,0.77,63900,0.77    0.04000   5.00000   -0.01000  -1.25000  49203
MOSTALEXP,20120203,0.82,0.82,0.78,0.78,446089,0.78   0.04000   4.87805   0         0         347949
MOSTALEXP,20120124,0.71,0.71,0.69,0.71,61478,0.71    0.03000   4.16667   -0.01000  -1.38889  43649
MOSTALEXP,20120130,0.73,0.73,0.70,0.73,59488,0.73    0.03000   4.10959   0         0         43426
MOSTALEXP,20120210,0.79,0.81,0.77,0.81,104120,0.81   0.03000   3.75000   0.01000   1.25000   84337
MOSTALEXP,20120213,0.80,0.80,0.78,0.80,86606,0.80    0.03000   3.70370   -0.01000  -1.23457  69284
MOSTALEXP,20120126,0.69,0.75,0.69,0.72,146353,0.72   0.02000   2.81690   0.04000   5.63380   105374
MOSTALEXP,20120131,0.72,0.73,0.71,0.72,72734,0.72    0.02000   2.73973   0         0         52368
MOSTALEXP,20120123,0.72,0.73,0.71,0.72,24133,0.72    0.02000   2.73973   0         0         17375
MOSTALEXP,20120214,0.78,0.81,0.78,0.79,56990,0.79    0.02000   2.50000   0.01000   1.25000   45022
MOSTALEXP,20120209,0.79,0.82,0.79,0.80,65243,0.80    0.02000   2.46914   0.01000   1.23457   52194
MOSTALEXP,20120118,0.69,0.70,0.68,0.69,62520,0.69    0.01000   1.44928   0.01000   1.44928   43138
MOSTALEXP,20120125,0.70,0.71,0.70,0.71,92317,0.71    0.01000   1.40845   0         0         65545
MOSTALEXP,20120201,0.71,0.74,0.71,0.74,199791,0.74   0.01000   1.38889   0.02000   2.77778   147845
MOSTALEXP,20120127,0.73,0.73,0.71,0.73,38157,0.73    0.01000   1.38889   0.01000   1.38889   27854
MOSTALEXP,20120207,0.78,0.79,0.77,0.79,56243,0.79    0.01000   1.28205   0.01000   1.28205   44431
MOSTALEXP,20120206,0.78,0.80,0.77,0.78,133597,0.78   0.01000   1.28205   0.02000   2.56410   104205
MOSTALEXP,20120221,0.81,0.81,0.79,0.80,112738,0.80   0.01000   1.25000   0.01000   1.25000   90190
MOSTALEXP,20120217,0.80,0.85,0.79,0.80,272245,0.80   0.01000   1.25000   0.05000   6.25000   217796
MOSTALEXP,20120216,0.81,0.81,0.79,0.80,30814,0.80    0.01000   1.25000   0.01000   1.25000   24651
MOSTALEXP,20120113,0.66,0.66,0.65,0.65,90267,0.65    0.00500   0.76336   0.00500   0.76336   58673
MOSTALEXP,20120220,0.80,0.82,0.80,0.80,83881,0.80    0         0         0.02000   2.50000   67104
MOSTALEXP,20120215,0.80,0.82,0.79,0.80,128714,0.80   0         0         0.03000   3.79747   102971
MOSTALEXP,20120208,0.79,0.84,0.79,0.81,280446,0.81   0         0         0.05000   6.32911   227161
MOSTALEXP,20120120,0.74,0.74,0.72,0.73,128831,0.73   0         0         0.02000   2.77778   94046
MOSTALEXP,20120117,0.67,0.71,0.67,0.69,284886,0.69   0         0         0.04000   5.97015   196571
MOSTALEXP,20120116,0.65,0.67,0.65,0.67,9548,0.67     0         0         0.02000   3.07692   6397
MOSTALEXP,20120202,0.75,0.87,0.75,0.82,1270955,0.82  -0.01000  -1.35135  0.13000   17.56757  1042183
MOSTALEXP,20120119,0.70,0.74,0.70,0.72,320471,0.72   -0.01000  -1.44928  0.05000   7.24638   230739

At the end of the pipe (after |column -t) it'd be nice to add something which highlights at least the string $(date +%Y%m%d), which at the moment evaluates to 20120222

Another example is tail -F /tmp/*.log | grep -C 9999 YouJustGotHacked except I wouldn't want the grep to actually filter out any lines, just make YouJustGotHacked a lot easier to spot in the noise.

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1  
less can do this, but (I don't think) you can pipe data through. It sounds like you have a typical use case in mind. It might help if you post some sample input, and expected output to get everyone thinking about your problem in a helpful way. Good luck. –  shellter Feb 22 '12 at 16:42
    
True, less nicely colors except I need it just to print w/highlighting and terminate, not wait for user interaction eg. paging or quitting--which then clears its output. Unless it has some option I'm not aware of. Use case: I tail -F tons of log files in one console to watch activity in realtime –  Marcos Feb 22 '12 at 17:16
    
possible duplicate of Colorized grep -- viewing the entire file with highlighting –  Michał Wróbel Sep 14 '13 at 16:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use egrep and match both the pattern you're looking for and line beginnings. As the latter always matches, but can't be coloured, it emulates what you're after.

egrep 'pattern|^' file

Edit: I originally learnt this from an answer to this question.

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1  
Good find, and simpler than the sed way. I had a feeling my question may turn out to be a duplicate of a much older one. –  Marcos Feb 22 '12 at 18:15

grep has a -C option, which can display contexts around the matching lines. You can take advantage of it.

grep -C 9999 'pattern' file
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; that did come to mind, however didn't like having to use the 9999 arbitrarily large number of lines (hoping the stdin would run out long before that). Also there's the issue of trying to avoid buffering as much as possible for near-realtime output –  Marcos Feb 22 '12 at 17:22

The sed trick you're looking for should be more or less like this:

sed 's/pattern/\x1b[01;31m&\x1b[0m/g' file

where:

  • pattern is the same you would use in grep
  • & in the replacement pattern means use the same text as matched
  • the characters surronding & are used to set the foreground color to red and reset it afterwards

More information about how to escape color sequences in sed in the answers to this question.

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Just switched your single-quotes to double so that the shell would take my variable as search pattern: | sed "s/$(date +%Y%m%d)/\x1b[01;31m&\x1b[0m/g" and that put out the itch. Thanks! –  Marcos Feb 22 '12 at 17:58

To expand on the less option mentioned by shellter (which works well if you just want to visually examine the colorized output and not pass it to another program), here are the steps:

  1. Pipe your output to less (or run less filename.txt).
  2. Press / to search forward (or ? to search backward).
  3. Enter your search term (a regex by default, or press Ctrl-r first to switch to using a simple string). Press Enter.
  4. The search term will be highlighted. Press n to move to the next occurrence, or N to move to the previous one.
  5. Press q to quit.
share|improve this answer
    
++ Great tool I use all the time. Except I use / or ? + Enter ,repeat search, for seeking fwd/back so my lazy fingers don't have to move much. Didn't know about the Ctrl-r, no wonder I became so friendly with the `\` key –  Marcos Feb 22 '12 at 17:46

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