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I am working on some genome data and I have 2 files ->

File1

A1 1   10
A1  15  20
A2  2   11
A2  13  16

File2

>A1
CTATTATTTATCGCACCTACGTTCAATATTACAGGCGAACATACCTACTA
AAGTGTGTTAATTAATTAATGCTTGTAGGACATAATAATAACAATTGAAT
>A2
GTCTGCACAGCCGCTTTCCACACAGACATCATAACAAAAAATTTCCACCA
AACCCCCCCCTCCCCCCGCTTCTGGCCACAGCACTTAAACACATCTCTGC
CAAACCCCAAAAACAAAGAACCCTAACACCAGCCTAACCAGATTTCAAAT

In file 1, 2nd and 3rd column represents the indexes in File2. So I want that, if character in column1 of file1 matches with character followed by symbol (>) in file2 , then from next line of that file2 give back the substring according to indexes in col2 and col3 of file1. (sorry, I know its complicated) Here is the desire output ->

Output

>A1#1:10
CTATTATTTA
>A1#15:20
ACCTA
>A2#2:11
TCTGCACAGC
>A2#13:16
GCTT

I know if I have only 1 string I can take out sub-string very easily ->

@ARGV or die "No input file specified";
open $first, '<',$ARGV[0] or die "Unable to open input file: $!";
$string="GATCACAGGTCTATCACCCTATTAACCACTCACGGGAGCTCTCCATGCAT";
while (<$first>) 
{
@cols = split /\s+/;
$co=$cols[1]-1;
$length=$cols[2]-$co;
$fragment =  substr $string, $co, $length;
print ">",$cols[0],"#",$cols[1],":",$cols[2],"\n",$fragment,"\n";
}

but here my problem is when should I input my second file and how should I match the character in col1 (of file1) with character in file2 (followed by > symbol) and then how to get substring?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I wasnt sure if they were all one continuous line or separate lines. I set it up as continuous for now.

Basically, read the 2nd file as master. Then you can process as many index files as you need.

You can use hash of arrays to help with the indexing. push @{$index{$key}}, [$start,$stop];

use strict;
my $master_file = "dna_master.txt";
if ($#ARGV) {
    print "Usage: $0 [filename(s)]\n";
    exit 1;
}

my %Data = read_master($master_file);

foreach my $index_file (@ARGV) {
    my %Index = read_index($index_file);
    foreach my $key (sort keys %Index) {
        foreach my $i (@{$Index{$key}}) {
            my ($start,$stop) = @$i;
            print ">$key#$start:$stop\n";
            my $pos = $start - 1;
            my $count = $stop - $start + 1;
            print substr($Data{$key},$pos,$count)."\n";
        }
    }
}

sub read_file {
    my $file = shift;
    my @lines;
    open(FILE, $file) or die "Error: cannot open $file\n$!";
    while(<FILE>){
        chomp; #remove newline
        s/(^\s+|\s+$)//g; # strip lead/trail whitespace
        next if /^$/;  # skip blanks
        push @lines, $_;
    }
    close FILE;
    return @lines;
}

sub read_index {
    my $file = shift;
    my @lines = read_file($file);
    my %index;
    foreach (@lines) {
        my ($key,$start,$stop) = split /\s+/;
        push @{$index{$key}}, [$start,$stop]; 
    }
    return %index;
}

sub read_master {
    my $file = shift;
    my %master;
    my $key;
    my @lines = read_file($file);
    foreach (@lines) {
        if ( m{^>(\w+)} ) { $key = $1 }
        else { $master{$key} .= $_ }
    }
    return %master;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your reply. Can you please tell me about what you said -> they were all one continuous line or separate lines. I can clarify if I missed something. –  Vikas Feb 22 '12 at 17:42
    
The test data from the 2nd file - the DNA sequences, appeared to be spread across multiple lines instead of one long sequence. This is ok, it will work either way. Unless, they are meant to be treated as separate items per type (ie. A1 has 2 rows, A2 has 3 rows). I currently concatenated the rows so A1 and A2 have one long continuous string of letters. If they need to be individual, then a minor adjustment to the loop is needed. –  Rich Feb 22 '12 at 19:34
1  
Both subs call the read_file sub which prepares the file by stripping out empty lines, newlines, and leading and trailing whitespace. This is needed to ensure your data is good. It loads the contents into an array @lines which they both iterate over. In read_index, each row is split by whitespace (tabs and/or spaces) and then stored into a hash of arrays (HoA). The key, start, and stop values are extracted from each row, start and stop are placed into an anonymous array [$start,$stop], which each group is added to that keys list. $hash{A1}->[[10,15],[15,20]] –  Rich Feb 23 '12 at 9:11
1  
That can be access like $hash{A1}->[0][0] = 10, $hash{A1}->[0][1] = 15. The read_master is very similar, however it concatenates text from each row until the next '>key' is detected. $h{A1} = "row1"."row2". This makes it easy to lookup the text for that key. Let me know if you any other questions. Hope that helps. –  Rich Feb 23 '12 at 9:16
1  
@m0skit0, I tend to disagree. I've been programming since 1983 and back then, if code wasn't in magazines, I don't think I would have ever learned Basic (about 8 different flavors), Assembler (PC,IBM,DG), COBOL, Pascal, C, C++, Perl, TCL, Python, Kornshell, and countless others. Coding by example helps with learning, especially with more advanced topics. I usually copy code thats new to me and then experiment with, break it, and then learn how to fix it. Ask the right questions, and you are on your way. –  Rich Feb 23 '12 at 9:29

Load File2 in a Hash, with A1, A2... as keys, and the DNA sequence as value. This way you can get the DNA sequence easily.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. But in file2, I do not know how many A1, A2...An are there (and on which line they are present), I just know that they are followed by symbol '>'. How should I take all A1 etc as keys and all DNA sequences as values? –  Vikas Feb 22 '12 at 17:05
    
Yes, that's what I meant. You do not need to know how many there are, but how to recognize them. If it's uneven lines -> keys, even lines -> sequences it'ss quite easy. Also you need to remove the leading ">" from the keys, which can be done easily with /^>(\w+)/ and taking $1 from this regex. –  m0skit0 Feb 22 '12 at 18:04

This 2nd update turns the master file into a hash of arrays as well.

This treats each row in the 2nd file as individual sequences.

use strict;
my $master_file = "dna_master.txt";
if ($#ARGV) {
    print "Usage: $0 [filename(s)]\n";
    exit 1;
}

my %Data = read_master($master_file);

foreach my $index_file (@ARGV) {
    my %Index = read_index($index_file);
    foreach my $key (sort keys %Index) {
        foreach my $i (@{$Index{$key}}) {
            my ($start,$stop) = @$i;
            print ">$key#$start:$stop\n";
            my $pos = $start - 1;
            my $count = $stop - $start + 1;
            foreach my $seq (@{$Data{$key}}) {
                print substr($seq,$pos,$count)."\n";
            }
        }
    }
}

sub read_file {
    my $file = shift;
    my @lines;
    open(FILE, $file) or die "Error: cannot open $file\n$!";
    while(<FILE>){
        chomp; #remove newline
        s/(^\s+|\s+$)//g; # strip lead/trail whitespace
        next if /^$/;  # skip blanks
        push @lines, $_;
    }
    close FILE;
    return @lines;
}

sub read_index {
    my $file = shift;
    my @lines = read_file($file);
    my %index;
    foreach (@lines) {
        my ($key,$start,$stop) = split /\s+/;
        push @{$index{$key}}, [$start,$stop]; 
    }
    return %index;
}

sub read_master {
    my $file = shift;
    my %master;
    my $key;
    my @lines = read_file($file);
    foreach (@lines) {
        if ( m{^>(\w+)} ) { $key = $1 }
        else { push @{ $master{$key} }, $_ }
    }
    return %master;
}

Output:

>A1#1:10
CTATTATTTA
AAGTGTGTTA
>A1#15:20
ACCTAC
ATTAAT
>A2#2:11
TCTGCACAGC
ACCCCCCCCT
AAACCCCAAA
>A2#13:16
GCTT
CCCC
ACAA
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