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I wrote a simple function in Visual Studio to be able to study how to write a C project in Visual Studio but it gave the following errors:

Error   1   error C2275: 'FILE' : illegal use of this type as an expression        
c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c    25    
1   Exc4

Error   2   error C2065: 'file' : undeclared identifier   
c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c    25  
1   Exc4

  Error 3   error C2065: 'file' : undeclared identifier 
 c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c   31     1    
    Exc4
  Error 6   error C2065: 'file' : undeclared identifier 
   c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c 39  1   
   Exc4
    Error   9   error C2065: 'file' : undeclared identifier 
   c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c 41  1   
    Exc4

   Error    12  error C2065: 'file' : undeclared identifier 
    c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c    45  1   
   Exc4
17  IntelliSense: a value of type "void *" cannot be used to initialize an 
     entity of type "Tmeasurement *"    c:\users\henry\documents\visual studio 
      2010\projects\exc4\exc4\measurement.c 99  33  Exc4

I never had this error when i compiled the function on the mac Xcode compiler. Hoping any one out there could explain why the statement FILE *file is not identified.

Tmeasurement readMeasurements(Tmeasurement a, char *filename)
{
    int filesize, i;
    struct stat st;
    stat(filename, &st);
    filesize = st.st_size;

    a.ArraySize = filesize;
    a.measureArray = (float*)malloc(filesize*sizeof(float));

    FILE *file = fopen(filename, "r+");
    // FILE *file = fopen(filename, "r");
    /*filesize = fread(a.measureArray, 1, filesize, file);
    a.ArraySize = filesize;*/

    if(file==NULL)
    {
        printf("Could not open mea.dat!\n");
        return; 
    }

    for(i=0;  i<102 &&(fgetc(file))!=EOF;i++)
    {
        fscanf(file,"%e",&a.measureArray[i]);
    }

    fclose(file);
    return a;
}
share|improve this question
    
You have all the required imports correct? There are a dozen similar questions to this. I suggest reading through them. Every single one of your errors is a syntax problem. –  Ramhound Feb 22 '12 at 16:56
    
if(file == NULL), You cannot just return; there, since your function is declared as returning a Tmeasurement. –  GeorgeAl Feb 22 '12 at 17:01
    
@Muggen, that didn't give any error when i ran it on xcode.why on VS? –  helpdesk Feb 22 '12 at 17:48
    
@Ramhound, where are the syntax error you are talking about? This code works perfectly fine on Xcode. Like I said, I am trying to learn how to write in a windows environment and that is where the errors started. –  helpdesk Feb 22 '12 at 17:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Microsoft compilers only support C89 standard, so variable declarations must be at the beginning of scope before any other statements.

Change to:

Tmeasurement readMeasurements(Tmeasurement a, char *filename)
{
   int filesize, i;
   struct stat st;
   FILE* file;

   ...

   file = fopen(filename, "r+");

   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hello @hmjd, Thanks alot for the reply. Now, it compiles fine. Please, is there a way I can check the standard of a compiler? –  helpdesk Feb 22 '12 at 17:54
    
@henryjoseph, unsure about that but I would expect that information to be in the documentation of any compiler you wish to use. I know the GNU compilers accept a command line argument specifying the standard you want to use (-std=c99 I think). –  hmjd Feb 22 '12 at 17:56
    
you mean by typing this instruction on the command line, I would get information of the compiler type on my Visual Studio? –  helpdesk Feb 23 '12 at 12:10
    
@henryjoseph, no. That specific example was for GNU compiler: Visual Studio does not that have. A google search may provide some collective information on what standards particular compilers support. Otherwise, documentation for whatever compiler you wish to use should contain that information. This wikipedia page provides a brief overview of the standards. –  hmjd Feb 23 '12 at 12:18

Visual Studio is a C89 compiler.

Mixing declarations and code is a C99 feature.

Do not mix declarations and code or do not use Visual Studio :)

share|improve this answer
    
How do you mean mixing declarations and code? the declarations are in another header file(.h) file. –  helpdesk Feb 22 '12 at 17:51
    
In the header file you have function declarations (usually called prototypes). Inside your functions (or blocks) you can also declare objects; in C89 all such declarations must precede statements with code. In your code you declare (and initialize) the object file (of type FILE *) after two assignement statements. –  pmg Feb 22 '12 at 18:18

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