Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This has been asked many, many times before and I've read loads of posts and forums on the internet about it, but I just can't get one object to rotate around it's own axis. I have several objects drawn like this:

 gl.glMatrixMode(GL2.GL_MODELVIEW);
       gl.glLoadIdentity();   
 .....
 gl.glPushMatrix();
       gl.glRotatef(angle, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
       gl.glTranslatef(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
       texture.bind(gl);
       gl.glTexCoordPointer(2, GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, textureRLt);
       gl.glNormalPointer(GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, normalRLt);
       gl.glVertexPointer(3, GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, vertexRLt);
       gl.glDrawElements(GL2.GL_TRIANGLES, countI, GL2.GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, indexRLt);
       gl.glPopMatrix();

And this is drawn correctly, with all textures and normals applied..

I know that OpenGL executes commands in reverse, so that's why glRotatef is first. Also I know that all rotations are around the origin, so I need to translate the object to that origin (not that I think I have to, because "the pen" is already at the origin because I save the matrix before drawing every object and pop it afterwards). Is it something with glDrawElements? Something doesn't seem right.

Any help will be greatly appreciated. :)

Edit: I can see how the objects rotate around the main x axis, but I want them to rotate around their local x-axis.

share|improve this question
5  
It's not that OpenGL "executes commands reversely", it's the way the transformation matrices are composed. – andrewmu Feb 22 '12 at 17:01
    
What you want to do is think of the operations as being applied locally instead of globally. So in your example, you are rotating around the local Y axis, and then translating in that new coordinate system. If you want the rotations to be more local, then they need to be done later. However, in your example, your translation is zero, so it has no effect, and order won't matter. Maybe you are just misunderstanding what the object's axes are. – Vaughn Cato Feb 22 '12 at 17:25

"OpenGL executes commands reversely", means it multiplies the transformation matrix from right rather than left. What does this mean?

Imagine transformation A and B:

y = Ax

transforms x by A and yields y

This is equivalent to:

// sudo code:
glA()
glDraw(x)

Now, usually, in programming you think you get the transformations in order that you write them. So, you think that

glA()
glB()
glDraw(x)

would give you

y = BAx

but that is wrong. You actually get:

y = ABx

This means that, first B is applied to x and then A to the result.

Put in english, take a look at this example:

glScalef(...)          // third, scale the whole thing
glTranslatef(...)      // second, translate it somewhere
glRotatef(...)         // first, rotate the object (or course,
                       // around its own axes, because the object is at origin)
glDrawElements(...)    // draw everything at origin

So, what you need to do is to write:

// When everything is drawn, move them to destination:
gl.glTranslatef(destination[0], destination[1], destination[2]);
// For every object, rotate it the way it should, then restore transformation matrix
// object: RLt
gl.glPushMatrix();
    gl.glRotatef(angle, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    texture.bind(gl);
    gl.glTexCoordPointer(2, GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, textureRLt);
    gl.glNormalPointer(GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, normalRLt);
    gl.glVertexPointer(3, GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, vertexRLt);
    gl.glDrawElements(GL2.GL_TRIANGLES, countI, GL2.GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, indexRLt);
gl.glPopMatrix();
// object: RLt2
gl.glPushMatrix();
    gl.glRotatef(angle2, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    texture.bind(gl);
    gl.glTexCoordPointer(2, GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, textureRLt2);
    gl.glNormalPointer(GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, normalRLt2);
    gl.glVertexPointer(3, GL2.GL_FLOAT, 0, vertexRLt2);
    gl.glDrawElements(GL2.GL_TRIANGLES, countI2, GL2.GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT, indexRLt2);
gl.glPopMatrix();
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the fast reaction @Shahbaz! Unfortunately I've tried that before (tried it once again now, just to make sure) but the effect is the same :( I've added gl.glTranslatef(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f) before drawing anything (in terms of openGL, after i've drawn everything) - at the beginning. The effect is the same; there is something strange that even before it rotates only one of the objects, but it is drawn with glBegin instead of vertex arrays – Peter Feb 22 '12 at 17:18
1  
Note that glTranslatef(0, 0, 0) doesn't bring the object to the origin, it just moves it by (0, 0, 0) which basically means it does nothing. If your object is at (x, y, z), you should translate it by (-x, -y, -z). Note that this can get very complicated if your previous transformations included rotation and scale. Your best shot in such a case would be to get the transformation matrix from opengl, extract the translation part and do the inverse. – Shahbaz Feb 22 '12 at 18:11
    
I did suspect something like that. That's a really complicated operation for such a simple thing to do :D – Peter Feb 22 '12 at 18:39
    
@Peter: Actually you shouldn't bother about glRotate, glTranslate, glScale at all. They've been removed from OpenGL-3 altogether. Instead you should build your matrices yourself. This is easier than you might think. Essentially you've to understand, that the upper left 3×3 part of the matrix defines rotation and scale and the rightmost 1×3 part does translation. The bottom 4×1 should be left as (0,0,0,1) – it's just a handy drop in to make the math nicer and is mostly used with different values to create the perspective effect in the projection. – datenwolf Feb 22 '12 at 19:39
    
@datenwolf, what I hate most is that my hobby of programming OpenGL has suddenly got completely deprecated and I don't have time to catch up :-/ – Shahbaz Feb 22 '12 at 23:55

I am not sure, whether you are updating 'angle' variable periodically. If you are not, then there won't be any rotation. The pseudo code is below. You can use the gluttimerfunc for periodic update of the variable.

for (every opengl loop)

angle+=5.0f

Satish

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.