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I have an ASP MVC3 restful service that uses basic authentication. After searching stack overflow, I created the following code.

public class BasicAuthentication : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        var req = filterContext.HttpContext.Request;
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(req.Headers["Authorization"]))
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpNotFoundResult();
        }
        else
        {
            var credentials = System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.ASCII
                        .GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(req.Headers["Authorization"].Substring(6)))
                        .Split(':');
            var user = new { Name = credentials[0], Password = credentials[1] };
            if(!(user.Name == "username" && user.Password == "passwords"))
            {
                filterContext.Result = new HttpNotFoundResult();
            }
        }
    }
}

1) Is an ActionFilterAttribute the best way to do this?

2) Is setting filterContext.Result the correct way to deny access to the controller method?

3) Is there anything I'm doing wrong?

Thanks.

-Nick

share|improve this question
    
are you using basic for forms /custom type auth with basic (two stage auth) or still using domain accounts? –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Feb 22 '12 at 17:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

1) Is an ActionFilterAttribute the best way to do this?
I think so. This approach mirrors the implementation of the built in Authorize attribute.

2) Is setting filterContext.Result the correct way to deny access to the controller method?
Yes. Thats whats it there for. (1)

3) Is there anything I'm doing wrong?

  • You assume that the content of the Authorization header is in the correct format and is correctly encoded.
  • You assume that the request is for basic authenication and not any other authentication scheme.
  • I would prefer to use HttpUnauthorizedResult() to send a http 401 error instead of a http 404 error via HttpNotFoundResult().

Below in my implementation of your code (which I'm sure has its issues too).

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        try
        {
            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Headers["Authorization"]))
            {
                filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
            }
            else
            {
                if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Headers["Authorization"].StartsWith("Basic ", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
                {
                    string[] credentials = ASCIIEncoding.ASCII.GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Headers["Authorization"].Substring(6))).Split(':');

                    if (credentials.Length == 2)
                    {
                        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(credentials[0]))
                        {
                            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
                        }
                        else if (!(credentials[0] == "username" && credentials[1] == "passwords"))
                        {
                            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
                }
            }

            base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
        }
        catch
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
        }
    }

Notes

  • I haven't included illegal character checks for username and password.
  • I couldn't settle on how to implement exception handling so I have gone with simplicity.

References

(1) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/gg232768.aspx

share|improve this answer

Refactored version of Adrian's

public class BasicAuthenticationAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private static readonly string AuthorizationHeader = "Authorization";
    private static readonly string BasicHeader = "Basic ";
    private static readonly string Username = "username";
    private static readonly string Password = "password";
    private static readonly char[] Separator = ":".ToCharArray();

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        try
        {
            if (!Authenticated(filterContext.HttpContext.Request))
                filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();

            base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
        }
        catch
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
        }
    }

    private bool Authenticated(HttpRequestBase httpRequestBase)
    {
        bool authenticated = false;

        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(httpRequestBase.Headers[AuthorizationHeader]) == false &&
            httpRequestBase.Headers[AuthorizationHeader].StartsWith(BasicHeader, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            string[] credentials = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(Convert.FromBase64String(
                httpRequestBase.Headers[AuthorizationHeader].Substring(BasicHeader.Length))).Split(Separator);

            if (credentials.Length == 2 && credentials[0] == Username && credentials[1] == Password)
            {
                authenticated = true;
            }
        }

        return authenticated;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the time and effort. Very useful. However should the first condition be if "not" authenticated then raise the HttpUnauthorisedResult. –  fluent May 15 '13 at 15:00

1) No, ActionFilter attributes are not a good approach to authenticate a user. (As we need to authenticate once and set authenticate cookie, so HttpContext.User will remain authenticated till cookie expires)

2) Yes, setting filtercontext.Result is a ideal way to prevent access. ( But Instead of assigning HttpNotFoundResult, use RedirectResult to redirect to login page)

3) I really don't understand why to have such implementation for Authorization. The best approach would be to have an action that will receive form posted data (username and password). and use Authorize attribute to prevent unauthorize access.

following is the code from default MVC3 sample application in VS2010.

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult LogOn(LogOnModel model, string returnUrl)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            if (Membership.ValidateUser(model.UserName, model.Password))
            {
                FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie(model.UserName, model.RememberMe);
                if (Url.IsLocalUrl(returnUrl) && returnUrl.Length > 1 && returnUrl.StartsWith("/")
                    && !returnUrl.StartsWith("//") && !returnUrl.StartsWith("/\\"))
                {
                    return Redirect(returnUrl);
                }
                else
                {
                    return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
                }
            }
            else
            {
                ModelState.AddModelError("", "The user name or password provided is incorrect.");
            }
        }

        // If we got this far, something failed, redisplay form
        return View(model);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I understand the forms login model, and use it for a normal website. How does this work for a restful service? How does the user provide the login? –  Nikhil Feb 22 '12 at 19:07
    
MVC is still restful using forms authentication.Are you looking for some system/service will invoke the mvc uri, passing network credentials. If so, above approach seems fine.(But better you can a BaseController and inherit all child controllers from it.Then you can write same code as above in OnActionExecuting method ,Unless not all of you code is invoked by an API) –  Manas Feb 23 '12 at 4:19
2  
i think you completed ignore the words "service" and "basic authentication" in the question title while answering. –  kpadmanabhan Nov 8 '12 at 18:41
    
Answer is irrelevant and partly because of this irrelevant too. Filters ARE the preferred way to authenticate and autorize requests, regardless if WebAPI or MVC are used. Redirecting to login page is not a concern of authentication process, this will be done by ASP.Net or another layer if needed. Another issue why ths answer is incorrect is that forms authentication uses cookies whereas APIs are usually using Authorization header, typically bearer tokens but there are many other schemes. –  user3285954 Dec 28 '14 at 14:09

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