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I have a foreach method like this one:

public void Initialize(ClassB fixed)
{
    foreach (ClassA item in itemCollection)
    {
        this.InitializeStock(fixed, item);
    }
}        

I would like to use a Parallel.ForEach with this one but not sure on how to do it. I cannot set the fixed parameter as a class attribute as the Initialize method is already called from another Parallel.ForEach.

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's not clear what the problem is. This should be fine:

public void Initialize(ClassB fixed)
{
    Parallel.ForEach(itemCollection, item =>
    {
        this.InitializeStock(fixed, item);
    });
}

The fixed variable will be captured by the lambda expression so that it can be used when calling InitializeStock.

EDIT: If you really don't want lambda expressions:

private class ClassBHolder
{
    private readonly ClassB fixed;
    // Foo is the class which has the Initialize method
    private readonly Foo container;

    internal ClassBHolder(ClassB fixed, Foo container)
    {
        this.fixed = fixed;
        this.container = container;
    }

    internal void Execute(ClassA item)
    {
        container.InitializeStock(fixed, item);
    }
}

public void Initialize(ClassB fixed)
{
    ClassBHolder holder = new ClassBHolder(fixed, this);
    Parallel.ForEach(itemCollection, holder.Execute);
}

... but really, which would you rather read?

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4  
@SoMoS: You should learn to embrace anonymous methods; there extremely useful. If you really don't want to, you'll need to create a separate class, the way the compiler does for you when you use an anonymous method. –  SLaks Feb 22 '12 at 17:17
1  
@SoMoS: You should take out the time to understand how they work. Especially when combined with LINQ, they can make your code much simpler and more readable. –  SLaks Feb 22 '12 at 17:21
1  
@SoMoS: Think about the work that the compiler does for you when there's a lambda expression capturing a variable (this is a lambda expression, not an anonymous method). Then be glad you don't have to do it yourself. You can do it without anonymous functions - you can create a class yourself to hold the fixed value if you really want - but why bother? It's boiler-plate code. –  Jon Skeet Feb 22 '12 at 17:22
1  
@SoMoS: See my edit for what you'd need to do without an anonymous function. "Simpler to read code" - really? –  Jon Skeet Feb 22 '12 at 17:26
1  
@SoMoS: The more you use lambda expressions, the happier you're likely to become with them. While I would usually stick to very short anonymous functions, for things like Parallel.ForEach it makes a lot of sense to have several-line ones. Of course you could always use a tiny lambda expression which just calls out to a "regular" method with as many parameters as you need. That's what you've got here, effectively. –  Jon Skeet Feb 22 '12 at 17:36

here try this:

public void Initialize(ClassB fixed)
{
    Parallel.ForEach(itemCollection, new ParallelOptions() { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 100 },
                (item, i, j) =>
                     {

                         this.InitializeStock(fixed, item);

                     });
}  
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