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Ok, here is the error I am getting:

    -[CFRunLoopTimer invalidate]: message sent to deallocated instance 0x109b05a0 (gdb)

Here is the code causing the crash:

    if (waitingOpponentTimer) {
      [waitingOpponentTimer invalidate]; //<-- Crash/error occurs here
      waitingOpponentTimer = nil;
    }

And elsewhere:

    NSTimer* waitingOpponentTimer;

And also:

    waitingOpponentTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO];

There is NO other occurence of waitingOpponentTimer anywhere, only the ones I have shown above. waitingOpponentTimeOut action just sets a few variables and does nothing to timers or to waitingOpponentTimer.

I have tried all the following IF statements to prevent the invalidate statement from being reached:

    if (waitingOpponentTimer) {
    if ([waitingOpponentTimer retainCount] > 0) {
    if (waitingOpponentTimer.isValid) {
    if (waitingOpponentTimer != nil) {

But in all cases, it still gets thru the IF statement and then causes the crash with the invalidate statement.

So my question is, why/how is invalidate causing an error when the object isValid and is not nil and it's retainCount is greater than zero?

Is there another way to check this to prevent invalidate from being reached?

I am a complete noob to iphone programming and have spent several hours googling to try and figure this out but cannot figure out what I am doing wrong. Any help and suggestions appreciated!

EDIT: Just to clarify, I am using this to manually stop the timer before it runs. I understand that if it runs out, it invalidates itself, which is why I am using the IF statement to check if it has already been invalidated (but it is not working). So I think the timer has already invalidated itself when this crash happens, but how do I check if it is already invalidated?

EDIT: Ok I marked the correct answer below. I do not know if there is actually a reason why the code gets by the IF statements when the timer was not retained and has already invalidated itself, but the answer is to always use RETAIN if you are going to use the timer in an IF statement.

Here is related info: Is there any reason to retain a scheduled NSTimer if you don't need to invalidate it?

share|improve this question
    
Where is this and elsewhere? Same file? Above, below the code causing the error? –  Bot Feb 22 '12 at 17:21
    
elsewhere is at the top of the .h file in the @interface section –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 17:29
    
Note that ([waitingOpponentTimer retainCount] > 0) is nonsense; retainCount can never return 0. –  bbum Feb 22 '12 at 18:19
    
That might be why it did not work then! :) –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Do you use ARC?

waitingOpponentTimer = [[NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO] retain];
share|improve this answer
    
What is ARC? I am using Xcode 4.2 and code is written to work on iOS 4+ –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 17:30
    
Automatic Reference Count –  NeverBe Feb 22 '12 at 17:35
1  
arc is a beautiful thing, if your not coding for earlier then ios4 i would recommend using it. but im not sure if that will fix the problem –  owen gerig Feb 22 '12 at 17:35
1  
just retain timer –  NeverBe Feb 22 '12 at 17:36
    
is it just the retain thats causing it? because he isnt using accessors? thats an easy test, add "retain" to the end of the NSTimer declaration. –  owen gerig Feb 22 '12 at 17:48

try calling isValid before starting the timer

that way you cant accidentally create 2 instances of it

think about this

 waitingOpponentTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO];

 waitingOpponentTimer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO];

    [waitingOpponentTimer invalidate]

there is still a timer floating around, and if it fires when your not expecting it can cause problems. so ya i would test for isValid before calling it

if ([waitingOpponentTimer isValid]
{
    [waitingOpponentTimer invalidate]

     waitingOpponentTimer = [[NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO] retain];
}else{

     waitingOpponentTimer = [[NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO] retain];
}
share|improve this answer
    
ok this seems like good advice and will consider it. but still does not answer question of why IF statements are not working! –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 17:42
    
need to see more code for that answer. i dont see how, when or how many times you call waitingOpponentTimer = [NSTimer..... or how, when or how many times you call release, invalidate or =nil on it –  owen gerig Feb 22 '12 at 17:44
    
dont forget too waitingOpponentTimer is a pointer not the actual NSTimer object. so it can get very messy, especially when not using ARC. maybe even more so then other pointer/object relationships. because its a scheduled event. and unless the pointer is pointing to the right scheduled event the release or any other calls wont work. –  owen gerig Feb 22 '12 at 17:46
    
ok, just check code with NSLog and waitingOpponentTimer=[NSTimer is only called one time, and the time is running out by itself, and the first time it gets to the invalidate statement is when it crash. –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 17:54
    
add retain. waitingOpponentTimer = [[NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:10.0f target:self selector:@selector(waitingOpponentTimeOut)userInfo:nil repeats:NO]retain]; . or make waitingOpponentTimer a property and synthesize it then do self.waitingOpponentTimer = [nstimer...... –  owen gerig Feb 22 '12 at 18:10

Most likely, you don't need to invalidate the timer. Since the timer is not repeating, it will invalidate itself once the allocated time has reached the end. This could be why the app is crashing, as well. If the timer has reached the end of its run, it sends itself the invalidate message, so when you call it later, it doesn't know what to do since it has already been invalidated. So my suggestion would be to just ignore the invalidating since it will handle itself (so long as it's non-repeating)

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i believe your wrong, because it nil's out the timer with invalidate but you can always call against nil (you just get nil back). im able to invalidate a timer twice without crashing –  owen gerig Feb 22 '12 at 17:29
    
But how does that explain why it has a retainCount > 0 for example? If it's already invalidated, then how is it getting past the IF statements? Is there a way to check if the object isNotInavalidated before trying to invalidate it? –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 17:33
    
I sometimes need to invalidate the timer before it is done counting down, which is why I need to do it! The answer though is that the timer needs to be reatined in order to use an IF statement on it. –  jsherk Feb 22 '12 at 18:28

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