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I'm finding myself by Javascript's variable scope, could someone explain to me why the first example doesn't work but the second does?

function test() {
  return typeof(the_variable) !== 'undefined' && the_variable;
}

(function () {
   var the_variable = "doesn't work";
   console.log(test());
}());

var the_variable = "does work";
console.log(test());

Output I get in my log:

false
does work

Also I would like to know how to do something similar to the first example,

Cheers, Dave.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Explained in comments:

function test() {
  return typeof(the_variable) !== 'undefined' && the_variable;
}

// The variable in this function is scoped to the anonymous function.
// It doesn't exist outside that function, so `test` cannot see it
(function () {
   var the_variable = "doesn't work";
   console.log(test());
}());

// This variable exists in a scope that wraps the `test` function, so it can see it.
var the_variable = "does work";
console.log(test());
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But the test function is called inside the anonymous function's scope so why can't test see things inside the anonymous function's scope? –  kzar Feb 22 '12 at 17:26
    
More explicitly, putting var foo anywhere within a scope is entirely equivalent to putting it as the first item within the scope. –  gsnedders Feb 22 '12 at 17:27
2  
@kzar Because it's not call-chain scope, it's lexical scope. –  gsnedders Feb 22 '12 at 17:28
    
So you get the global scope and the local one but not anything in between? –  kzar Feb 22 '12 at 17:30
    
Also, if so how can I do something like the first example? –  kzar Feb 22 '12 at 17:32

In Javascript, functions define scope. In your first example the_variable is outside of the scope of test. On the other hand, in the second example, the_variable is defined in the global scope and is available everywhere.

EDIT

Catch the_variable in a closure if you want it to be available to test.

var foo = (function () {
   var the_variable = "does work";
   function test() {
       return typeof(the_variable) !== 'undefined' && the_variable;
   }
   return {test : test};
}()); 
console.log(foo.test());

Output:

does work

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Right but if I call a function from within another function why can't the function called access the scope from where it was called? –  kzar Feb 22 '12 at 17:29
    
function test() opens a new scope. var from the enclosing anonymous function will not be available. Catch the_variable in a closure if it to be available. –  Sahil Muthoo Feb 22 '12 at 17:40
    
Ah cool idea but I can't define the test() function inside the closure, the closure is actually defined in a separate file. –  kzar Feb 22 '12 at 17:47

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