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I am trying to query elements in another window (different domain), opened from my site. For example, I might have a link like this:

<a href="#" onclick=openOtherWindow();>Click me</a>  

Which runs code like this:

function openOtherWindow() {
  var w = window.open("http://www.example.com/", "my_popup","height=500, width=800 left=20, top=40");
  console.log('Left:' + w.screenLeft);
  console.log('Num anchors: ' + w.document.anchors.length);
  console.log('Num images: ' + w.document.images.length);
  w.close();
}

The window opens, and the console shows:

Left: 20
Num anchors: 0
Num images: 0

(Yes, there are links and images). So, I figured maybe the window hadn't actually loaded, so tried something like:

function openOtherWindow() {
  var w = window.open("http://www.example.com/", "my_popup","height=500, width=800 left=20, top=40");
  w.onload = function() {
    console.log('Left:' + w.screenLeft);
    console.log('Num anchors: ' + w.document.anchors.length);
    console.log('Num images: ' + w.document.images.length);
  }
  w.close();
}

And now I am getting nothing in the console. I tried other ways of seeing what's going on (replace console.log() with alert()) but no go.

I think I have a fundamental misunderstanding of how to know when the other window is open and loaded. Can anyone de-confuse me?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the domain is different, you cannot access most (if not all) properties of the new window. This is called same-origin policy and it's for security reasons.

For example, imagine that you register on a website and they send you an activation code by mail. Out of "courtesy", they provide a link to GMail, Hotmail, Yahoo Mail and maybe a few other popular email providers. If they could access the contents from the new window, they could easily read your password when you type it in.

Further information:

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Thanks Dennis -- –  Tom Harrison Jr Feb 22 '12 at 17:53
    
What I meant to say... Thanks Dennis -- I was thinking same-origin was the source of my issue because in some of the several hundred other variants I tried, I was inserting new elements into the target window. But I thought it only applied to writing. Does this mean I cannot read (with JS) the same stuff I could read from my browser, or via view source? I'll re-read the links you provided. Thanks! –  Tom Harrison Jr Feb 22 '12 at 18:02
    
Yep. You're right. That's the problem. On to plan B. Thanks!! –  Tom Harrison Jr Feb 22 '12 at 18:06

When opening the window, it will instantly be populated with an empty page. Its properties are what you can access, just try

var w = window.open("http://www.example.com/", "my_popup","height=500, width=800 left=20, top=40");
console.log(w.document.URL);
console.log(w.history.current);
console.log(w.document.documentElement.outerHTML);
w.close();

In Opera I'm getting

about:blank

http://www.example.com/

<html dir="ltr"><head>
 <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width">
</head>
<body></body></html>

After the document is load, you won't be able to access it's properties any more due to the same origin policy; instead it will throw an security error and break your script.

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