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I have a piece of code that looks something like this (ClearImportTable and InsertPage are stored procedures):

datacontext.ClearImportTable() //Essentially a DELETE FROM table
for (int i = 1; i < MAX_PAGES; ++i){
    datacontext.InsertPage(i); //Inserts data into the table
}

This is a somewhat simplified version of my code, but the idea is that it clears the table before inserting records. The only problem is that if an error occurrs after ClearImportTable, all of the data from the table is wiped. Is there any way to wrap this in a transaction so that if there are any errors, everything will be put back the way it was?

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can do a transaction scope:

 using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
 {
     // do stuff here...
     transaction.Complete();
 }

If an exception occurs or the using block is left without hitting the transaction.Complete() then everything performed within the using block is rolled back.

You will need to reference the System.Transactions assembly.

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That requires using MSDTC, which is not always a good idea. – Otávio Décio Jun 2 '09 at 15:36
    
I believe MSDTC is only needed if you create more than one linq datacontext within the transcation and run queries against them. If you only create one datacontext object within the transaction scope it's not required. – Casey Williams Jun 2 '09 at 16:02
1  
MSDTC is only required when multiple resource managers are involved. So long as you only involve a single DataContext and connect to a single SQL Server instance, then you should use lightweight transactions. – jrista Jun 2 '09 at 16:19
    
Actually, a distributed transaction is required. I forgot, one of the stored procedures uses OPENQUERY. I get this error message: System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: The operation could not be performed because OLE DB provider "OraOLEDB.Oracle" for linked server "HOUSING_ODSPROD" was unable to begin a distributed transaction. OLE DB provider "OraOLEDB.Oracle" for linked server "HOUSING_ODSPROD" returned message "New transaction cannot enlist in the specified transaction coordinator. " Does that mean I'm screwed? – Jason Baker Jun 2 '09 at 18:45

As "Sailing Judo" mentioned above, I've used the TransactionScope blocks with great success when I need to call stored procs. However there's one "gotcha" that I've run into where an exception gets thrown saying that the "transaction is in doubt." To get around this I had to call a nondeferred method on the proc to make it evaluate the result immediately. So instead of

using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
{
    var db = new dbDataContext();

    db.StoredProc();
    transaction.Complete();
}

I had to call it like this...

using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
{
    var db = new dbDataContext();

    db.StoredProc().ToList();
    transaction.Complete();
}

In this example, ToList() could be any nondeferred method which causes LINQ to immediately evaluate the result.

I assume this is because LINQs lazy (deferred) nature isn't playing well with the timing of the transaction, but this is only a guess. If anyone could shine more light on this, I'd love to hear about it.

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Set the Transaction property on the DataContext?

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