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If I have a normal (weak) enumeration, I can use its enumerated values as non-type template parameters, like so:

enum { Cat, Dog, Horse };

template <int Val, typename T> bool magic(T &t)
{
    return magical_traits<Val>::invoke(t);
}

and call it as: magic<Cat>(t)

as far as I can see, if I have a strongly-typed enumeration and don't want to hard-code the enumeration type, I end up with:

enum class Animal { Cat, Dog, Horse };

template <typename EnumClass, EnumClass EnumVal, typename T> bool magic(T &t)
{
    return magical_traits<EnumVal>::invoke(t);
}

and now I have to write: magic<Animal, Animal::Cat>(t), which seems redundant.

Is there any way to avoid typing out both the enum class and the value, short of

#define MAGIC(E, T) (magic<decltype(E), E>(T));
share|improve this question
    
Why not template <EnumClass EnumVal, typename T> bool magic(T &t)? Are you going to pass other types of enums to this function? I can't think you are, since magical_traits<> only takes one parameter itself, and it wouldn't make sense. –  Mooing Duck Feb 22 '12 at 18:38
    
Hmm, I over-simplified the example then: yes, the idea is to handle multiple enum classes without duplication. It's a shame, because it could deduce the enum class fine if I passed the value as a function argument, but not if it's a template parameter. –  Useless Feb 22 '12 at 18:59
    
Fact is, this is exactly the point of enum classes, to be a different type each, and to be especially distinct from int and the likes. –  Xeo Feb 22 '12 at 19:31
    
True; it's a shame that deduction won't work for non-type parameters the same as for type parameters here. I can deduce the containing class and member type from a single pointer-to-member argument, but there's no way to do the equivalent for a strongly-typed enumerated argument. –  Useless Feb 22 '12 at 19:40
    
why not just template <Animal a,typename T> bool magic(T &t) ? –  balki Feb 24 '12 at 8:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm sorry, I have to tell you that

It is not possible

Take the macro, put it into a scary named header and protect it from your colleague's cleanup script. Hope for the best.

share|improve this answer
    
Time for some macro wrappers then ... or maybe I can survive a little repetition so long as I know it isn't just me. –  Useless Feb 22 '12 at 18:31

If you're only interested in the enum's value, and not its type, you should be able to use a constexpr function to convert the value to an integer, avoiding repeating the type name.

enum class Animal { Cat, Dog, Horse };

template <typename T> constexpr int val(T t)
{
    return static_cast<int>(t);
}

template <int Val, typename T> bool magic(T &t)
{
    return magical_traits<Val>::invoke(t);
}

magic<val(Animal::Cat)>(t);

However, as pointed out already by others, if you want to make this depend on the type as well, it will not work.

share|improve this answer

I dunno about if constexpr can be used in this way, nor do I have a compiler to check it with, but how about:

template <typename EnumType, typename T>
bool magic(constexpr EnumType e, T& t)
{
    return magical_traits<e>::invoke(t);
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, just looked it up and tried an online compiler. constexpr is not allowed as a parameter. Not sure why... Meh. –  Adrian May 10 '13 at 21:25

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