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I am trying to write 2GB to a file using pwrite, but my code below is writing a smaller amount. However, if I write 2GB in total using 2 pwrite calls of 1GB, that works.

Expected file size: 2147483648 bytes (2GB), observed: 2147479552

Compiled as : gcc -Wall test.c -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 -D_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE=1 -D_XOPEN_SOURCE=600

gcc v 4.5.0 on 64 bit Opensuse

Here is the complete program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main()
{
    size_t size = 2147483648; //2GB
    off_t offset = 0;
    int fd;

    char *buf = (char*) malloc (size * sizeof(char));
    if(buf == NULL)
    {
        printf("malloc error \n");
        exit(-1);
    }

    if(-1 == (fd = open("/tmp/test.out", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0644)))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error opening file. Exiting..\n");
        free(buf);
        exit(-1);
    }

    if(-1 == (pwrite(fd, buf, size, offset)))
    {
        perror("pwrite error");
        free(buf);
        exit(-1);
    }

    free(buf);
    return 0;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the pwrite man page:

Description

pwrite() writes up to count bytes from the buffer starting at buf to the file descriptor fd at offset offset. The file offset is not changed.

Return Value

On success, the number of bytes written is returned (zero indicates that nothing was written), or -1 on error, in which case errno is set to indicate the error.

Note that there's no requirement for pwrite() to write the number of bytes you asked it to. It can write less, and this is not an error. Usually, you'd call pwrite() in a loop - if it doesn't write all the data, or if it fails with errno==EINTR, then you call it again to write the rest of the data.

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Would you know what makes pwrite not write all the bytes? –  KVM Feb 22 '12 at 18:33
1  
shrug. I don't know, but I can guess. There's probably some point in the kernel code where the amount written has to fit in a 32-bit signed integer. So they have to limit it to ((2^31)-1) bytes. Since they're imposing arbitrary limits, the exact value doesn't matter much, so they limited it to ((2^31)-4096) bytes, which is a whole number of 4kB pages. This is allowed by the spec, and proper apps will have a loop so they'll be fine. (In a proper app, not the toy example you've posted, the pwrite could be interrupted at any point by a signal, so proper apps need the loop to handle that). –  user9876 Feb 22 '12 at 18:43
    
[To be clear, I don't mean any disrespect when I describe your code as a "toy example". On the contrary, toy examples are exactly the right thing to post in Stack Overflow questions - no-one wants to wade through thousands of lines of "proper app" to answer a question!] –  user9876 Feb 22 '12 at 18:49
    
Great! That makes sense (and dont worry abt the "toy example" :-D) –  KVM Feb 22 '12 at 19:08
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I think you should not only check whether pwrite returns -1 but also what is the number of bytes actually written and handle the case if the number of bytes written is less than you want to write. See the pwrite manpage for details.

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