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Lets say I have a unit test similar to the below, is there a way to write one unit test rather than several but also avoid having a for loop in the unit test?

[Test]
public void RunTestWithMultipleOptions()
{
  MyClass code = new MyClass();
  code.Prefix = "{DS1}";  //Options are {DS1}, {DS2}, {DS3}, {DS4}
  //Property could be set to
  //code.Prefix = "{DS1}{DS2}";
  //code.Prefix = "{DS1}{DS2}{DS3}";

  //And so on

 //Based on how many {DS} used a method needs calling

  code.InputDataStore(1,"Data1");

  //If used {DS1}{DS2} in Prefix then
  //code.InputDataStore(1,"Data1");
  //code.InputDataStore(2,"Data2");

  //If used {DS1}{DS2}{DS3} in Prefix then
  //code.InputDataStore(1,"Data1");
  //code.InputDataStore(2,"Data2");
  //code.InputDataStore(3,"Data3");

  string OutputData = String.Empty;

  code.Output += delegate(int Id, string Data) 
                 { 
                    if (Id == (int)OutputsEnum.OutputModified)
                      OutputData = Data; 
                 };



  //Call the input method which will raise the Output event which we can assert against
  code.Input("hi there");

  //Assert that output has replace the prefix {DS} with the data in the datastorecontent list

  Assert.AreEqual("Data1hi there", OutputData);
}

I can pass in the property value to the unit test method and use test cases but based on what the property is MyMethod needs to be called x number of times. Without putting a loop in the test I can't think of a way without having all the permetations as separate unit tests.

UPDATE: Here is the main contents of the class:

    public event Action<int, string> Output;

    public string Prefix { get; set; }

    public string Postfix { get; set; }

    private List<string> DataStoreContents = new List<string>() { "", "", "", "" };

    public void Input(string Data)
    {
        if (Output != null)
            {
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Prefix))
                {
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS1}", DataStoreContents[0]);
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS2}", DataStoreContents[1]);
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS3}", DataStoreContents[2]);
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS4}", DataStoreContents[3]);
                }

                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Postfix))
                {
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS1}", DataStoreContents[0]);
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS2}", DataStoreContents[1]);
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS3}", DataStoreContents[2]);
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS4}", DataStoreContents[3]);
                }

                Output((int)OutputsEnum.OutputBeforeModified, Data);
                Output((int)OutputsEnum.OutputModified, Prefix + Data + Postfix);
                Output((int)OutputsEnum.OutputAfterModified, Data);
            }
        }
    } 

    public void InputDataStore(int DataStore, string Data)
    {
        if (DataStore < 1 || DataStore > 4)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Datastore number out of range");

        DataStoreContents[DataStore - 1] = Data;
    }

}

I want to test that when I call InputDataStore(1,"MyData1"); InputDataStore(2, "MyData"); that Output does in fact replace the relevant {DS1} values with the relevant string and also combine it with any other {DS} values

share|improve this question
    
why can't you use a loop if you need one? – BrokenGlass Feb 22 '12 at 18:46
    
If you are testing the behavior of your method when it is executed multiple times (such as when in a for loop), then in my opinion, the loop is entirely appropriate. – Steve Czetty Feb 22 '12 at 18:47
1  
Why is it bad practice to not put a for loop in tests? Just like any belief of "<thing> considered harmful" there are always perfectly reasonable uses of the thing, where tryng to avoid it only creates less mantainable code. You want a loop here, so use a loop. :-) – Jason Malinowski Feb 22 '12 at 18:56
1  
The methods you test seems smelly – Yurii Hohan Feb 22 '12 at 19:04
1  
@Jon: loop in tests is bad in terms of cutting corners or repeating tested code logic. When you need to use loop, take it as a sign something went wrong earlier (however sometimes it is the only way). Why is your string property behaving as if it was a list? It's almost asking "make me a list/collection". – jimmy_keen Feb 22 '12 at 19:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One options is to test each call apart and all of them together. If you test A&B&C, you can limit yourself to testing A,B,C apart and A&B&C together. One option is the next code(made some assumptions):

 [TestFixture]
    public class ToTestFixture
    {
        [SetUp]
        public void SetUp()
        {
            _instance = new ToTest();
            _instance.InputDataStore(1, "1");
            _instance.InputDataStore(2, "2");
            _instance.InputDataStore(3, "3");
            _instance.InputDataStore(4, "4");
        }

        private ToTest _instance;
        [TestCase("{DS1}","1")]
        [TestCase("{DS2}", "2")]
        [TestCase("{DS3}", "3")]
        [TestCase("{DS4}", "4")]
        [TestCase("{DS1}{DS2}{DS3}{DS4}", "1234")]
        [Test]
        public void TestPrefixReplacements(string input, string expectedResult)
        {

            _instance.Prefix = input;

            //Call the input method which will raise the Output event which we can test
            _instance.Input("Any string goes here as we test only prefix." );

            Assert.AreEqual(expectedResult, _instance.Prefix);
        }

    }

    internal enum OutputsEnum
    {
        OutputBeforeModified,
        OutputModified,
        OutputAfterModified
    }

    public class ToTest
    {
        public event Action<int, string> Output = (x, result) => Console.WriteLine(x.ToString() + result);

        public string Prefix { get; set; }

        public string Postfix { get; set; }

        private List<string> DataStoreContents = new List<string>() {"1", "2", "3", "4"};

        public void Input(string Data)
        {
            if (Output != null)
            {
                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Prefix))
                {
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS1}", DataStoreContents[0]);
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS2}", DataStoreContents[1]);
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS3}", DataStoreContents[2]);
                    Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS4}", DataStoreContents[3]);
                }

                if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Postfix))
                {
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS1}", DataStoreContents[0]);
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS2}", DataStoreContents[1]);
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS3}", DataStoreContents[2]);
                    Postfix = Postfix.Replace("{DS4}", DataStoreContents[3]);
                }

                Output((int) OutputsEnum.OutputBeforeModified, Data);
                Output((int) OutputsEnum.OutputModified, Prefix + Data + Postfix);
                Output((int) OutputsEnum.OutputAfterModified, Data);
            }
        }
        public void InputDataStore(int DataStore, string Data)
        {
            if (DataStore < 1 || DataStore > 4)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Datastore number out of range");

            DataStoreContents[DataStore - 1] = Data;
        }
    }

Anyhow I feel there is a bond between "DS1" and the index of the array. (1-0, 2-1). This means next refactoring is possible:

Prefix = Prefix.Replace("{DS"+index+"}", DataStoreContents[index-1]);

More than that I guess output action decision is strange and two if-s are duplicate code. This is what I mean:

   public void Input(string Data)
    {
        if (Output != null)
        {
            Prefix = ApplyReplaceRules(Prefix);

            Postfix = ApplyReplaceRules(Postfix);

            Output((int) OutputsEnum.OutputBeforeModified, Data);
            Output((int) OutputsEnum.OutputModified, Prefix + Data + Postfix);
            Output((int) OutputsEnum.OutputAfterModified, Data);
        }
    }

    private string ApplyReplaceRules(string patternString)
    {
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Postfix))
        {
            patternString = patternString.Replace("{DS1}", DataStoreContents[0]);
            patternString = patternString.Replace("{DS2}", DataStoreContents[1]);
            patternString = patternString.Replace("{DS3}", DataStoreContents[2]);
            patternString = patternString.Replace("{DS4}", DataStoreContents[3]);
        }

        return patternString;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer – Jon Feb 22 '12 at 21:08

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