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New to vba. How to pass dictionary object to another function.

Sub aaa(dict As Object)
Set dict = CreateObject("Scripting.Dictionary")
...
process dict 
End Sub

Sub process(dict As Scripting.Dictionary)
    MsgBox dict.Count
End Sub

gives a compile error: User defined type not defined


Also,

Set dict = CreateObject("Scripting.Dictionary")

works, but

Dim dict As New Scripting.Dictionary 

gives, "User defined type not defined"

I use excel 2010

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you use CreateObject you are binding the object at run-time (ie, late binding). When you use As Scripting.Dictionary the object is bound at compile-time (ie, early binding).

If you want to do early binding you will need to set a reference to the correct library. To do this, go to Tools --> References... and select "Microsoft Scripting Runtime"

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You need to add a reference to the Microsoft Scripting Runtime library for your macro to be able to recognize the types. Goto Tools->References and check for Microsoft Scripting Runtime.

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To avoid the error add the Microsoft Scripting Runtime (in Tools -> References).
Simplified example:

Sub test_dict()
    Dim dict As New Scripting.Dictionary
    Call process(dict)
End Sub

Sub process_dict(dict As Scripting.Dictionary)
    MsgBox dict.Count
End Sub
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I would revise this answer to use late binding only, and use an object parameter:

Sub aaa(dict As Object)
Set dict = CreateObject("Scripting.Dictionary")
...
process dict 
End Sub

Sub process(dict As Object)
    MsgBox dict.Count
End Sub
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Welcome to Stackoverflow. It's not clear what that new answer brings. You say you would use Late Binding only, but don't say why. –  manuell Feb 20 '14 at 18:40
    
Code is more reusable in new situations without undue references which can interfere with portability. Some libraries are not identical versions and not always found on another system late binding just keeps options open and less potential problems between releases, if you don't need intellisense. –  mrbillbenson Apr 7 '14 at 2:26

After you adding the "Tools->References->Microsoft Scripting Runtime" try this

Private Sub CommandButton1_Click()

    Dim myLocalDictionary As New Dictionary
    myLocalDictionary.Add "a", "aaa"
    myLocalDictionary.Add "b", "bbb"
    myLocalDictionary.Add "c", "ccc"

    Call testPassDictionary(myLocalDictionary)

End Sub

Sub testPassDictionary(myDictionary As Dictionary)
    MsgBox myDictionary.Count
End Sub
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