Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have a sparse non-rectangular matrix A:

>> A = round(rand(4,5))
A =

     0     1     0     1     1
     0     1     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     1
     0     1     1     0     0

I would like to obtain the matrix B where the non-zero entries of A are replaced by their linear index in row-first order:

B =

     0     2     0     4     5
     0     7     0     0    10
     0     0     0     0    15
     0    17    18     0     0

and the matrix C that where the non-zero entries of A are replaced by the order in which they are found in a row-first search:

C =

     0     1     0     2     3
     0     4     0     0     5
     0     0     0     0     6
     0     7     8     0     0

I am looking for vectorized solutions for this problem that scale to large sparse matrices.

share|improve this question
    
I feel like I'm missing something - could you not just take the transpose of B? –  aganders3 Feb 22 '12 at 20:03
    
@agander3 I believe it works in this case because they are using the ones matrix. –  Ian Hincks Feb 22 '12 at 20:16
    
I think the question should read "My question, is, is there a way to efficiently compute the indices in a row-first fashion?" –  Ian Hincks Feb 22 '12 at 20:22
    
Suggestion: set a seed value for reproducibility. –  Iterator Feb 22 '12 at 20:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a solution that doesn't require any transposing back and forth:

>> B = A;              %# Initialize B
>> C = A;              %# Initialize C
>> mask = logical(A);  %# Create a logical mask using A

>> [r,c] = find(A);    %# Find the row and column indices of non-zero values
>> index = c + (r - 1).*size(A,2);  %# Compute the row-first linear index
>> [~,order] = sort(index);         %# Compute the row-first order with
>> [~,order] = sort(order);         %#   two sorts

>> B(mask) = index     %# Fill non-zero elements of B

B =

     0     2     0     4     5
     0     7     0     0    10
     0     0     0     0    15
     0    17    18     0     0

>> C(mask) = order     %# Fill non-zero elements of C

C =

     0     1     0     2     3
     0     4     0     0     5
     0     0     0     0     6
     0     7     8     0     0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks gnovice. This is very nice, although I am a bit concerned about the speed of ismember. In my experience ismember tends to be slow when working with large inputs. The other calls seem fast enough. Is there a way to avoid using ismember for computing C ? –  Amelio Vazquez-Reina Feb 22 '12 at 21:40
    
@roseck: There is another way using two sorts instead of ISMEMBER and one sort. I've updated my answer. –  gnovice Feb 22 '12 at 21:48

If I understand what you are asking, a couple of tranpositions should do the trick. The key is that find(A.') will do "row-first" indexing on A, where .' is the short hand for the transpose of a 2D matrix. So:

>> A = round(rand(4,5))
A =

     0     1     0     1     1
     0     1     0     0     1
     0     0     0     0     1
     0     1     1     0     0

then

B=A.';
B(find(B)) = find(B);
B=B.';

gives

B =

     0     2     0     4     5
     0     7     0     0    10
     0     0     0     0    15
     0    17    18     0     0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ian. I have updated my question. Sorry for not having been clearer from the beginning. I am looking for two matrices B and C associated with a sparse matrix A. Your answer correctly outputs the matrix B I am looking for. –  Amelio Vazquez-Reina Feb 22 '12 at 20:31

An outline (Matlab isn't on this machine, so verification is delayed):

  1. You can use find() to get the coordinate list. Let T = A'; [r,c] = find(T)
  2. From the coordinate list, you can create both B and C. Let valB = sub2ind([r,c],T) and valC = 1:length(r)
  3. Use the sparse command to create B and C, e.g. B = sparse(r,c,valB), and then transpose, e.g. B = B' (or could do sparse(c,r,valB)).

Or, as @IanHincks suggests, let B = A'; B(find(B)) = find(B). (I'm not sure why .' is recommended, but, again, I don't have Matlab in front of to check.) For C, simply use C(find(C)) = 1:nnz(A). And transpose back, as he suggests.

Personally, I work with coordinate lists all the time, having migrated away from the sparse matrix representation, just to cut out the costs of index lookups.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what the speed difference is between .' and '...but since I'm usually working with complex data, I tend to use .' when I want a transpose, and ' when I want a conjugate-transpose. –  Ian Hincks Feb 22 '12 at 21:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.