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I want to know how to populate the following hash structure:

my $hash = {
    'user' => [
        {
            'id' => '1',
            'name' => 'John'
        },
        {
            'id' => '2',
            'name' => 'Pat'
        }

    ]
};

I want to be able to dynamically populate this hash. I want to loop around values from my database and push (add) new values (id, name) in order to populate the hash.

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@Benoit: Wrong, actually, he is using an anonymous hash reference. He could use my %hash = (...); –  Platinum Azure Feb 22 '12 at 19:32
    
What exactly do the values from your database look like? Most data layer APIs already return the data in precisely this format so you don't need to do anything. –  DVK Feb 22 '12 at 19:38
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order to populate a value in a hash of hashes, one can just use :

my %hash;
....
$hash{$key}{$subkey} = $value;

Be careful when you loop through them, however! The scalar value $hash{$key} will actually be a scalar reference to the sub-hash, not the sub-hash object itself.

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1  
He's using a hash reference, so it should be $hash->{$hey}{$subkey} = $value; –  Platinum Azure Feb 22 '12 at 19:33
    
fair enough, I honestly assumed he meant %hash myself :) –  asf107 Feb 22 '12 at 19:34
    
Thanks Platinum Azure and asf107. Since I'm populating this hash dynamically, how to I add new values ? Here's my code. As you can see, this won't work because the previous value will always get overwritten. foreach my $user (@users) { $hash->{user}{id} = $user[0]; $hash->{user}{name} = $user[1]; } Thanks –  Mark Marina Feb 22 '12 at 19:40
    
How is @users populated? is it a anon array or values? If its values, you will need to use a while loop or for loop where you control the stepping. Is it @users = ('John',1,'Pat',2) or @users = (['John',1],['Pat',2]) ? –  Rich Feb 22 '12 at 20:01
    
@MarkMarina - updated my answer based on your comment –  DVK Feb 22 '12 at 20:35
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To add another element to that structure:

# Get the element
my $hashRef = {
    'id' => '1',
    'name' => 'John'
};
# You didn't specify what you have as far as DB data
my $hashRef = someMethodReturningDatabaseData(); 

# Add to the arrayref:
my $hash = { user => [] }; # Initialize - only once
$hash->{user} ||= []; # As alternative, always make sure to have an arrayref,
                      # on every iteration
# Add to the array ref
push @{ $hash->{user} }, $hashRef;

Based on your comment to another answer, you can do

my $hash = { user => [] }; # Initialize - only once
foreach my $user (@users) {
    push @{ $hash->{user} }, { id => $user->[0], name => $user->[1] };
}

As a note, your data structure looks very weird - it's not clear why you need the outer hash with just one hard-coded key "user".

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+1 for ||=. On a side note, as of Perl 5.14, dereferencing the array ref is not necessary anymore (perldoc.perl.org/functions/push.html). –  Martin Feb 22 '12 at 19:47
3  
@Martin - good point. I'm still stick in 5.8/5.005 land :( –  DVK Feb 22 '12 at 19:58
    
@Martin, Maybe, but it's experimental, and has bugs (doesn't work on all arrays, doesn't autovivify). –  ikegami Feb 22 '12 at 22:29
    
You need to change $user->[0] and $user->[1] .When I tested it earlier, I thought it was a new feature. :) –  Rich Feb 23 '12 at 7:34
    
@Rich - duh. Sorry. fixed –  DVK Feb 23 '12 at 12:33
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    my $user = {
        id   => $id,
        name => $name,
    };

    push @{ $hash->{user} }, $user;

Nit: $hash->{user} should be named $hash->{users}

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