Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Whenever I do something like the following:

public class MyDto
{
    [Key]
    public int ID { get; set; }

    public int ParentID { get; set; }

    public String Name { get; set; }
}

MyDataContext dataContext = new MyDataContext();

MyParentDto myParentDto; // <-- Existing parent DTO querried from the server. Has a relation to MyDto on MyDto.ParentID == MyParentDto.ID.
List<MyDto> myDtos = new List<MyDto>();

myDtos.Add(new MyDto
    {
        Name = "First MyDto!"
    });

myDtos.Add(new MyDto
    {
        Name = "Second MyDto!"
    });

// Some time later.


foreach (var myDto in myDtos)
{
    myDto.ParentID = myParentDto.ID;
    dataContext.MyDtos.Add(myDto);
}

dataContext.SubmitChanges(OnMyCallback)

I get the following vague exception, but my data submits just fine:

System.ServiceModel.DomainServices.Client.DomainOperationException: Submit operation failed.  An entity with the same identity already exists in this EntitySet.  

The stack trace ends with:

System.ServiceModel.DomainServices.Client.EntitySet.AddToCache(Entity entity)
System.ServiceModel.DomainServices.Client.Entity.AcceptChanges()

Both MyDto instances are set to Detached before they are added to dataContext and New afterwards. If I reduce the number of added MyDto instances to one, I get no error. If I call SubmitChanges in between the two adds. Again, both of the MyDto instances are added to the database just fine, but the client crashes with the Exception. What is going on? Thanks.

Edits:

// On the server

[Insert]
public void InsertMyDto(MyDto a_myDto) // <- Yes I prefix. :p
{
    try
    {
        MyEntity myEntity = new MyDto
        {
            ParentID = a_myDto.ParentID,
            Name = a_myDto.Name
        }   

        ObjectContext.MyEntities.AddObject(myEntity);
        ObjectContext.SaveChanges();

    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        throw; // <- Never hits this spot.
    }
}

// Call back

public void OnMyCallback(SubmitOperation a_submitOperation)
{
        if (a_submitOperation.HasError)
            throw a_submitOperation.Error; // <- It doesn't matter if I have this or not, the client crashes anyway.

        // Other stuff that is not hit because it throws the exception above.
}
share|improve this question
    
Is ID an auto-increment column? And if so, does EF know that? – hvd Feb 22 '12 at 19:47
    
can you post your submit changes code? (plus the callback action) – sebagomez Feb 22 '12 at 19:52
    
@hvd, Yes and yes. – Jordan Feb 22 '12 at 19:55
    
@Jordan For your second "yes", how does EF know that? I don't see it in your question. – hvd Feb 22 '12 at 19:56
    
@hvd, Through the MyEntity data entity. The ID field of MyEntity is set to be Identitystore generated pattern and Entity Key is true. I added the server code above. – Jordan Feb 22 '12 at 20:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I found that the solution to my problem is to save the ID back to the dto when the entity is saved. Like this:

[Insert]
public void InsertMyDto(MyDto a_myDto) // <- Yes I prefix. :p
{
    try
    {
        MyEntity myEntity = new MyDto
        {
            ParentID = a_myDto.ParentID,
            Name = a_myDto.Name
        }   

        ObjectContext.MyEntities.AddObject(myEntity);
        ObjectContext.SaveChanges();

        a_myDto.ID = myEntity.ID; // <- Solution

    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        throw; // <- Never hits this spot.
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Have you tried setting the parent instead of it's ID?

foreach (var myDto in myDtos)
{
    myDto.Parent = myParentDto;
} //Assuming myParentDto is already in the context, if not add it first

Edit: I'm taking a wild guess here but could you check the HashCode of the objects right before the Exception occurs? You could also try overriding the GetHashCode() method to return something random every time just to test those are the exact entities involved in the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I considered this, but I don't believe the parent relationship is the problem. I'll try it though. The trouble seems to be when it comes back and tries to cache the DTO's; consider the stack trace. – Jordan Feb 23 '12 at 15:39
    
nope. Same issue. :( – Jordan Feb 23 '12 at 20:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.