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I have a working WCF service which used JSON as its RequestFormat and ResponseFormat.

[ServiceContract]     
public interface IServiceJSON 
{ 

    [OperationContract]   
    [WebInvoke(Method = "POST", RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)] 
    MyClassA echo(MyClassA oMyObject); 

} 

[DataContract] 
public class MyClassA 
{ 
    [DataMember] 
    public string message; 

    [DataMember] 
    public List<MyClassB> myList; 

    public MyClassA() 
    { 
        myList = new List<MyClassB>(); 
    } 
} 

[DataContract] 
public class MyClassB 
{ 
    [DataMember] 
    public int myInt; 

    [DataMember] 
    public double myDouble; 

    [DataMember] 
    public bool myBool; 

    [DataMember] 
    public DateTime myDateTime; 

}

The myDateTime property of class MyClassB is of type DateTime. This is being serialized to the following format: "myDateTime":"/Date(1329919837509+0100)/"

The client I need to communicate with can not deal with this format. It requires it to be a more conventional format like for example: yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss

Is it somehow possible to add this to the DataMember attribute? Like so:

[DataMember format = “yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss”] 
public DateTime myDateTime;

Thanks in advance!

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Did you find a solution? The only way I did it was a kludge workaround, stackoverflow.com/questions/25894068/… –  bpeikes Sep 17 '14 at 15:01
    
No real solution except for the workaround described by tad donaghe below, which comes down to the same as what you are referring to: add an additional datamember of type string. Maybe you should edit tad's answer and add your example for completeness. –  Brabbeldas Sep 17 '14 at 19:03
    
Yeah, I've looked at MS reference code for WCF and serialization and it's unreadable. It's no wonder it appears that they've dumped REST over WCF. –  bpeikes Sep 17 '14 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just pass it as an already formatted string?

That is, don't pass the date in your DataContract as a date. Make that member a string instead, and format the string the way your client it wants it.

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Could you please explain what you mean? –  Brabbeldas Feb 24 '12 at 8:11
    
Updated my answer a bit. –  Tad Donaghe Feb 24 '12 at 15:00

Here's an example of the already checked answer...

[DataContract]
public class ProductExport
{
    [DataMember]
    public Guid ExportID { get; set; }

    [DataMember( EmitDefaultValue = false, Name = "updateStartDate" )]
    public string UpdateStartDateStr
    {
        get
        {
            if( this.UpdateStartDate.HasValue )
                return this.UpdateStartDate.Value.ToUniversalTime().ToString( "s", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture );
            else
                return null;
        }
        set
        {
            // should implement this...
        }
    }

    // this property is not transformed to JSon. Basically hidden
    public DateTime? UpdateStartDate { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public ExportStatus Status { get; set; }
}

The class above defines two methods to handle the UpdateStartDate. One that contains the nullable DateTime property, and the other convert the DateTime? to a string for the JSon response from my service.

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