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I'm having problems using a ostream in my logger class. For some reason, the std::endl is never printed out and so no newline is added. I am sure there is something wrong, I'm having problems trying to understand how to use my ostream in my own classes so I have probably done something fundamentaly wrong.

class MyStreamBuf : public std::streambuf
{
    public:
    MyStreamBuf() : std::streambuf() 
    {

    }
};

class MyLogger : public std::ostream
{
public:
    MyLogger(MyStreamBuf* buf) : std::ostream(buf) { mBuf = buf; }
    ~MyLogger() { delete mBuf; }

    template <typename T>
    inline MyLogger& operator << (T const& value)
    {
#ifdef _WIN32 || _WIN64
        std::cout << value;
#endif

        return *this;
    }

    inline std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& (*f)(std::ostream&))
    {

        return f(*this);
    }

    MyStreamBuf* mBuf;
};



int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    MyStreamBuf* buf = new MyStreamBuf();
    MyLogger logger(buf);
    logger << "kekekek" << "asdf: " << 23 << std::endl;
    logger << "kekekek" << "asdf: " << 23 << std::endl;;

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

Output:

kekekekasdf: 23kekekekasdf: 23
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2  
endl isn't a constant or anything like that. Rather, it's a function, like std::endl(std::cout). You might make specific arrangements for that. –  Kerrek SB Feb 22 '12 at 20:38
    
Why not just std::streambuf is implemented? On that way you could do something like: MyStreamBuf* buf = new MyStreamBuf(); std::ostream logger(buf); You should implement just 3 functions: sync, overflow and underflow. –  Naszta Feb 22 '12 at 20:40
    
You print everything to cout, but not endl! (first overload triggered for values, last for endl and first contains cout << value, while last does not –  Lol4t0 Feb 22 '12 at 20:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

inline std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& (*f)(std::ostream&))
{
        std::cout << f;
        return *this;
}
share|improve this answer

You got the basic approach right when using a custom stream buffer class. However, this is the place you want to implement the specific logic rather than in the class derived from std::ostream!

Just to explain what currently happens: when you call f(*this) the function f() is called with the std::ostream base which receives the output and gets flush() called. Your class is entirely out of the picture.

Here is what you should do: * remove the output operators from your MyLogger class * implement overflow() in you stream buffer to deal with overflowing its buffer (e.g. send characters somewhere or increase the buffer) * implement sync() to send any buffered characters and do whatever else you need to do when the stream is flushed * probably MyLogger should own the stream buffer and set its vase up properly; typically that's all a class derived from std::ostream does

There ate plenty examples on how this looks like out there. Search for streambuf and James Kanze or me to locate a couple.

share|improve this answer

You need to send the endl somewhere. By doing f(*this) you're trying to send it to yourself, but your object doesn't have the necessary methods to do that. If you look in #include <ostream>, the function endl uses the function put to put a \n in the stream and then flushes it.

You need to write the end line somewhere. For example if you're writing to cout then you can do

(*f)(std::cout);
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