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Technology: .NET 4, C#, WinForms, Visual Studio 2010

I am in the processing of learning data binding and have been unable to get even a simple example to work as expected. I have a form with a label that I am binding to that shows the current mouse cursor coordinates.

public partial class Form1 : Form, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    [Bindable(true)]
    private String cursorPosition;
    public String CursorPosition
    {
        get
        {
            return cursorPosition;
        }

        set
        {
            cursorPosition = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("CursorPosition");
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        CursorPosition = "(" + Convert.ToString(e.X) + " , " + Convert.ToString(e.Y) + ")";
    }

    private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    } 
}

From the designer, I have set the label's Data Binding to bind the Text property to form1BindingSource - CursorPosition. What am I missing?

Edit: Updated code snippet.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the designer, I have set the label's Data Binding to bind the Text property to form1BindingSource - CursorPosition. What am I missing?

Have you set:

form1BindingSource.DataSource = this;  // (or whatever the real data source is)

e.g. in the form's constructor, after InitializeComponent?

(This assumes that your Form1 instance is the data source, and you're binding the controls to it via a BindingSource.)


A few further detail suggestions:

  1. Choosing the form itself as data source is somewhat unusual. IMHO it's better to separate all bound-to properties into a separate, non-UI data object. This then allows you to create a reusable base type for the INotifyPropertyChanged implementation.

  2. As @rfmodulator says in his answer, the BindableAttribute is attached to the field:

    [Bindable(true)]
    private String cursorPosition;
    public String CursorPosition
    …
    

    You probably meant to attach it to the property:

    private String cursorPosition;
    [Bindable(true)]
    public String CursorPosition
    …
    
  3. Your setter should probably look like this:

    set
    {
        if (!string.Equals(cursorPosition, value)      // +
        {                                              // +
            cursorPosition = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("CursorPosition");
        }                                              // +
    }
    

    That is, only raise the PropertyChanged event when the property value actually changes.

  4. You probably want to change your NotifyPropertyChanged method to this:

    private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;          // +
        if (handler != null)                                            // ~
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));  // ~
        }
    }
    

    This is because PropertyChanged could in theory change between the null check and the invocation. You can exclude this theoretical possibility by creating a local copy of the event delegate.

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Thank you! Not setting the DataSource was what I was missing and I don't remember seeing it any of the documentation. I did refactor out the non-view code into a proper controller as you suggested. I agree your new setter and NotifyPropertyChanged methods are much better. –  Noren Feb 23 '12 at 15:32

I assume you want the PropertyChanged event to fire? You are setting the backing variable's value in Mouse_Move, not the property's value. As a result, the call to NotifyPropertyChanged won't get called.

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Good catch. I've updated the code to reflect the changes, but the label still does not update. –  Noren Feb 22 '12 at 20:55
    
I would check whether PropertyChanged has a value when NotifyPropertyChanged is called. –  Ann L. Feb 22 '12 at 20:57
    
No, it doesn't -- it's null. I don't understand where it is initialized. The references I've found at MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229614.aspx) are identical to my code. –  Noren Feb 22 '12 at 21:37
    
I wonder whether making the form itself the data object is somehow throwing it off. But I also noticed the third point in this page, here. It indicates that for every changed property, you need a "PropertyNameChanged" event. So -- if I'm interpreting it correctly -- you'd also need a CursorPositionChanged event. –  Ann L. Feb 22 '12 at 21:52
    
@Ann L.: Winforms data binding supports several change notification mechanisms, even when they're mixed up. Either INotifyPropertyChanged or PropertyNameChanged will suffice. @Noren, have you actually set the .DataSource to the form? See my answer. –  stakx Feb 22 '12 at 23:27

You shouldn't implement INotifyPropertyChanged on components, controls and forms because databinding will rely on the XXXChanged event paradigm to listen for change notification. Internally, databinding uses property descriptors to listen for change events. They hint how the class detects changes in the documentation for the PropertyDescriptor.SupportsChangeEvents property. This has to do with the history of winforms databinding. XXXChanged was the way to do databinding & change notification before .NET 2.0. INotifyPropertyChanged was introduced in 2.0 in favor of the XXXChanged pattern.

The SupportsChangeEvents property indicates whether value change notifications for this property may originate from outside the property descriptor, such as from the component itself, or whether notifications will only originate from direct calls made to the SetValue method. For example, the component may implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface, or may have an explicit nameChanged event for this property.

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You're setting the Bindable attribute on the field but calling NotifyPropertyChanged with the property as the argument.

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