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Backbone's documentation states:

The events property may also be defined as a function that returns an events hash, to make it easier to programmatically define your events, as well as inherit them from parent views.

How do you inherit a parent's view events and extend them?

Parent View

var ParentView = Backbone.View.extend({
   events: {
      'click': 'onclick'
   }
});

Child View

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
   events: function(){
      ????
   }
});
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11 Answers 11

up vote 128 down vote accepted

One way is:

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
   events: function(){
      return _.extend({},ParentView.prototype.events,{
          'click' : 'onclickChild'
      });
   }
});

Another would be:

var ParentView = Backbone.View.extend({
   originalEvents: {
      'click': 'onclick'
   },
   //Override this event hash in
   //a child view
   additionalEvents: {
   },
   events : function() {
      return _.extend({},this.originalEvents,this.additionalEvents);
   }
});

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
   additionalEvents: {
      'click' : ' onclickChild'
   }
});

To check whether Events is function or object

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
   events: function(){
      var parentEvents = ParentView.prototype.events;
      if(_.isFunction(parentEvents)){
          parentEvents = parentEvents();
      }
      return _.extend({},parentEvents,{
          'click' : 'onclickChild'
      });
   }
});
share|improve this answer
    
That's great... Maybe you could update this to show how you would inherit from a ChildView (check if the prototype events is a function or object)... Or maybe I'm overthinking this whole inheritance stuff. –  brent Feb 22 '12 at 22:06
    
@brent Sure, just added third case –  soldier.moth Feb 22 '12 at 22:44
10  
If i'm not mistaken you should be able to use parentEvents = _.result(ParentView.prototype, 'events'); instead of 'manually' checking if events is a function. –  Koen. Aug 22 '13 at 12:29
3  
@Koen. +1 for mentioning the underscore utility function _.result, which I hadn't noticed before. For anyone who's interested, here's a jsfiddle with a bunch of variations on this theme: jsfiddle –  EleventyOne Jan 4 '14 at 5:54
    
Just to throw my two cents in here, i believe the second option is the best solution. I say this because of the sheer fact that it is the only method that is truly encapsulated. the only context used is this versus having to call the parent class by instance name. thank you very much for this. –  jessie james jackson taylor Oct 16 '14 at 1:42

The soldier.moth answer is a good one. Simplifying it further you could just do the following

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
   initialize: function(){
       _.extend(this.events, ParentView.prototype.events);
   }
});

Then just define your events in either class in the typical way.

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6  
Good call, though you probably want to swap this.events & ParentView.prototype.events otherwise if both define handlers on the same event the Parent's handler will override the Child's. –  soldier.moth Apr 6 '12 at 0:03
    
Good point. I didn't think of that. I'll update the answer. –  34m0 Apr 6 '12 at 5:24
    
@Soldier.moth did you mean for @34mo to write: {},ParentView.prototype.events,this.events ? Just checking as underscore.extend says: "It's in-order, so the last source will override properties of the same name in previous arguments." –  AJP Jun 3 '12 at 9:47
    
@AJP yes {},ParentView.prototype.events,this.events is the way it should be. It was originally _.extend(this.events,ParentView.prototype.events) –  soldier.moth Jun 4 '12 at 16:13
1  
@Soldier.moth, okay I've edited it to be as {},ParentView.prototype.events,this.events –  AJP Jun 4 '12 at 22:31

You could also use the defaults method to avoid creating the empty object {}.

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
  events: function(){
    return _.defaults({
      'click' : 'onclickChild'
    }, ParentView.prototype.events);
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
This causes the parent handlers to be bound after the child handlers. In most cases not a problem, but if a child event should cancel (not override) a parent event it is not possible. –  Koen. Aug 22 '13 at 12:41

If you use CoffeeScript and set a function to events, you can use super.

class ParentView extends Backbone.View
  events: ->
    'foo' : 'doSomething'

class ChildView extends ParentView
  events: ->
    _.extend {}, super,
      'bar' : 'doOtherThing'
share|improve this answer
    
This only works if the parent events variable is a function rather than an object. –  Michael Jan 13 at 4:29

Short version of @soldier.moth's last suggestion:

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
  events: function(){
    return _.extend({}, _.result(ParentView.prototype, 'events') || {}, {
      'click' : 'onclickChild'
    });
  }
});
share|improve this answer

This would also work:

class ParentView extends Backbone.View
  events: ->
    'foo' : 'doSomething'

class ChildView extends ParentView
  events: ->
    _.extend({}, _.result(_super::, 'events') || {},
      'bar' : 'doOtherThing')

Using straight super wasn't working for me, either was manually specifying the ParentView or inherited class.

Access to the _super var which is available within any coffeescript Class … extends …

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// ModalView.js
var ModalView = Backbone.View.extend({
	events: {
		'click .close-button': 'closeButtonClicked'
	},
	closeButtonClicked: function() { /* Whatever */ }
	// Other stuff that the modal does
});

ModalView.extend = function(child) {
	var view = Backbone.View.extend.apply(this, arguments);
	view.prototype.events = _.extend({}, this.prototype.events, child.events);
	return view;
};

// MessageModalView.js
var MessageModalView = ModalView.extend({
	events: {
		'click .share': 'shareButtonClicked'
	},
	shareButtonClicked: function() { /* Whatever */ }
});

// ChatModalView.js
var ChatModalView = ModalView.extend({
	events: {
		'click .send-button': 'sendButtonClicked'
	},
	sendButtonClicked: function() { /* Whatever */ }
});

http://danhough.com/blog/backbone-view-inheritance/

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This CoffeeScript solution worked for me (and takes into account @soldier.moth's suggestion):

class ParentView extends Backbone.View
  events: ->
    'foo' : 'doSomething'

class ChildView extends ParentView
  events: ->
    _.extend({}, _.result(ParentView.prototype, 'events') || {},
      'bar' : 'doOtherThing')
share|improve this answer

If you are sure that the ParentView has the events defined as object and you don't need to define events dynamically in ChildView it is possible to simplify soldier.moth's answer further by getting rid of the function and using _.extend directly:

var ParentView = Backbone.View.extend({
    events: {
        'click': 'onclick'
    }
});

var ChildView = ParentView.extend({
    events: _.extend({}, ParentView.prototype.events, {
        'click' : 'onclickChild'
    })
});
share|improve this answer

A pattern for this that I am fond of is modifying the constructor and adding some additional functionality:

// App View
var AppView = Backbone.View.extend({

    constructor: function(){
        this.events = _.result(this, 'events', {});
        Backbone.View.apply(this, arguments);
    },

    _superEvents: function(events){
        var sooper = _.result(this.constructor.__super__, 'events', {});
        return _.extend({}, sooper, events);
    }

});

// Parent View
var ParentView = AppView.extend({

    events: {
        'click': 'onclick'
    }

});

// Child View
var ChildView = ParentView.extend({

    events: function(){
        return this._superEvents({
            'click' : 'onclickChild'
        });
    }

});

I prefer this method because you do not have to identify the parent -one less variable to change. I use the same logic for attributes and defaults.

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Wouldn't it be easier to create specialized base constructor from Backbone.View that handles the inheritance of events up the hierarchy.

BaseView = Backbone.View.extend {
    # your prototype defaults
},
{
    # redefine the 'extend' function as decorated function of Backbone.View
    extend: (protoProps, staticProps) ->
      parent = this

      # we have access to the parent constructor as 'this' so we don't need
      # to mess around with the instance context when dealing with solutions
      # where the constructor has already been created - we won't need to
      # make calls with the likes of the following:   
      #    this.constructor.__super__.events
      inheritedEvents = _.extend {}, 
                        (parent.prototype.events ?= {}),
                        (protoProps.events ?= {})

      protoProps.events = inheritedEvents
      view = Backbone.View.extend.apply parent, arguments

      return view
}

This allows us to reduce(merge) the events hash down the hierarchy whenever we create a new 'subclass'(child constructor) by using the redefined extend function.

# AppView is a child constructor created by the redefined extend function
# found in BaseView.extend.
AppView = BaseView.extend {
    events: {
        'click #app-main': 'clickAppMain'
    }
}

# SectionView, in turn inherits from AppView, and will have a reduced/merged
# events hash. AppView.prototype.events = {'click #app-main': ...., 'click #section-main': ... }
SectionView = AppView.extend {
    events: {
        'click #section-main': 'clickSectionMain'
    }
}

# instantiated views still keep the prototype chain, nothing has changed
# sectionView instanceof SectionView => true 
# sectionView instanceof AppView => true
# sectionView instanceof BaseView => true
# sectionView instanceof Backbone.View => also true, redefining 'extend' does not break the prototype chain. 
sectionView = new SectionView { 
    el: ....
    model: ....
} 

By creating a specialized view: BaseView that redefines the extend function, we can have subviews(like AppView, SectionView) that want to inherit their parent view's declared events simply do so by extending from BaseView or one of its derivatives.

We avoid the need to programmatically define our event functions in our subviews, which in most cases need to refer to the parent constructor explicitly.

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