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I am using two math libraries in a game project. One is the GLM library and the other one is the math part of Box2D. Occasionally conversion between the two is necessary, like this:

b2Vec2 vec1(1.0f, 1.0f);
glm::vec2 vec2(vec1.x, vec1.y);

I am wondering if there is a better approach to do it more seamlessly, without editing either library?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that the conversion cannot be done implicitly without modifying the libraries.

However, to simplify your transformation code tou could implement simple transformation functions, something like:

inline glm::vec2 make_glmVec2(const b2Vec2 &v) {
    return glm::vec2(v.x, v.y);
}
inline glm::vec3 make_glmVec3(const b2Vec3 &v) {
    return glm::vec3(v.x, v.y, v.z);
}

If there is (almost) direct correspondence between types of those 2 libraries, you could even use a simpler name for all your transformation functions, like toGlm and simple overload it for all the types you need:

inline glm::vec2 toGlm(const b2Vec2 &v) {
    return glm::vec2(v.x, v.y);
}
inline glm::vec3 toGlm(const b2Vec3 &v) {
    return glm::vec3(v.x, v.y, v.z);
}

Edit

I tried implementing a "proxy" class which could work as a bridge between your two classes coming from two libraries. The proxy class contains constructors and cast operators which allow you to create to and from those classes. Unfortunately, you need to call the constructor explicitly, otherwise the compiler will not even consider using this class:

//Library 1:
class Vec1 {
public:
  int x;
  int y;
  Vec1(int _x, int _y) : x(_x), y(_y) {}
};

//Library 2:   
class Vec2 {
public:
  int e1;
  int e2;
  Vec2(int _x, int _y) : e1(_x), e2(_y) {}
};

//Your code

class VecProxy {
public:
  int pxX;
  int pxY;

  VecProxy(const Vec1& v1) : pxX(v1.x), pxY(v1.y) {}
  VecProxy(const Vec2& v2) : pxX(v2.e1), pxY(v2.e2) {}

  operator Vec1() {return Vec1(pxX, pxY); }
  operator Vec2() {return Vec2(pxX, pxY); }

};

int main() {
  Vec1 v1(2,3);
  Vec2 v2=VecProxy(v1);
  Vec1 v3=VecProxy(v2);
}

Note that you can use the same name, no mater in which direction you are casting, which may be marginally better than my previous suggestion above. I don't think you can make the constructor being called implicitly.

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In my opinion, it is much easier to write a convert function from one type to another and overload it to convert vice-versa. –  Ram Aug 3 '12 at 4:40
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In theory, you could add implicit conversion operators to one or both libraries (although implicit conversions aren't necessarily a good idea). But you've said you can't edit either libary, so that rules that out.

So one alternative would be to introduce your own vector class, and supply it with the necessary conversion operators. Then whenever you need a vector in your code, you always store it as an object of your custom class, and (implicitly) convert when you need to use the libraries.

But again, the trouble that implicit conversion can cause might outweigh the superficial benefits (see Item 5 of More Effective C++ for more details on this).

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I know this is a bit old, but I recently ran into the same situation with my current project. I wanted to share my solution, which works well for me. These are just the types I use most frequently ( I typedef'd the types for easier (read: lazier) typing in my project ). This could be extended/tweaked more probably, but hopefully this will give another option to anyone using these two libraries together.

typedef b2Vec2 b2vec2;
typedef b2Mat22 b2mat2;
typedef glm::vec2 vec2;
typedef glm::mat2 mat2;

//Conversion types
namespace Convert
{
///////////////////////////////////////
//Use case examples
//
// Turn the glm vector2 into a box2d type
// vec2 a = vec2( 1, 2 );
// b2vec2 b = Convert::v2(a).to_box2d;
//
// Access the box2d b2vec2 like a glm type
// b2vec2 c = b2vec2( 1, 2 );
// Convert::v2(c).to_glm = vec2(3,4);
//
// Turn the const glm vector2 into a box2d type
// const vec2 d = vec2( 1,2 );
// b2vec2 e = Convert::c_v2(d).to_box2d;


//Don't use these directly. See the use case examples
union _Vec2 {
    _Vec2( vec2* _v ):glm(_v){}
    _Vec2( b2vec2* _v ):box2d(_v){}
    vec2* glm;
    b2vec2* box2d;
};
union _CVec2 {
    _CVec2( const vec2* _v ):glm(_v){}
    _CVec2( const b2vec2* _v ):box2d(_v){}
    const vec2* glm;
    const b2vec2* box2d;
};

union _Mat2 {
    _Mat2( mat2* _m ):glm(_m){}
    _Mat2( b2mat2* _m ):box2d(_m){}
    mat2* glm;
    b2mat2* box2d;
};

//Convert between vec2 and b2vec2
struct v2 {

private:
    _Vec2 data;

public:

    vec2& to_glm;
    b2vec2& to_box2d;

    v2( vec2& _v )
    :data( &_v )
    ,to_glm( *data.glm )
    ,to_box2d( *data.box2d ){}

    v2( b2vec2& _v )
    :data( &_v )
    ,to_glm( *data.glm )
    ,to_box2d( *data.box2d ){}
};

//Convert between const vec2 and const b2vec2
struct c_v2 {

private:
    _CVec2 data;

public:

    const vec2& to_glm;
    const b2vec2& to_box2d;

    c_v2( const vec2& _v )
    :data( &_v )
    ,to_glm( *data.glm )
    ,to_box2d( *data.box2d ){}

    c_v2( const b2vec2& _v )
    :data( &_v )
    ,to_glm( *data.glm )
    ,to_box2d( *data.box2d ){}
};

//Convert between mat2 and b2mat22
struct m2 {

private:
    _Mat2 data;

public:

    mat2& to_glm;
    b2mat2& to_box2d;

    m2( mat2& _m )
    :data( &_m )
    ,to_glm( *data.glm )
    ,to_box2d( *data.box2d ){}

    m2( b2mat2& _m )
    :data( &_m )
    ,to_glm( *data.glm )
    ,to_box2d( *data.box2d ){}
};

}

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