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Are there any situations where using will not dispose of the object it is supposed to dispose of?

For example,

using(dbContext db = new dbContext()){ ... }

is there any way that after the last } db is still around?

What if there is this situation:

object o =  new object();
using(dbContext db = new dbContext()){
 o = db.objects.find(1);
}

Is it possible that o can keep db alive?

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1  
If by "alive" you mean Dispose() has not been called that is not possible (as long as the app is not shutting down or anything else dramatic.) –  BrokenGlass Feb 22 '12 at 22:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you're confusing two concepts: disposing and garbage collection.

Disposing an object releases the resources used by this object, but it doesn't mean that the object has been garbage collected. Garbage collection will only happen where this are no more references to your object.

So in your example, db.Dispose will be called at the end of the using block (which will close the connection), but the DbContext will still be referenced by o. Since o is a local variable, the DbContext will be eligible for garbage collection when the method returns.

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If the method returns o, will that prevent DbContext from being eligible for garbage collection? –  Travis J Feb 22 '12 at 22:42
1  
@TravisJ, yes, it will extend the lifetime of the DbContext, until it becomes effectively unreachable (i.e. not in a local variable nor referenced by a reachable object) –  Thomas Levesque Feb 22 '12 at 22:43
    
Would using a direct call to the garbage collection (GC.Collect) be considered inappropriate to ensure that the lifetime of DbContext cannot extend beyond the method? –  Travis J Feb 22 '12 at 22:45
    
Calling GC.Collect is almost never a good idea; the GC performs a collect automatically when it is necessary, and it usually knows better than you when it is necessary, so don't try to force it unless you know exactly what you're doing. Why do you care if DbContext is still in memory, as long as the connection is closed? –  Thomas Levesque Feb 22 '12 at 23:03
    
Just trying to be efficient with my memory management :) Thanks for the answer and comments. –  Travis J Feb 22 '12 at 23:08

Alive and Disposed are two very different things.

If o is an object that holds a reference (via a field, property, itself, etc.) to the dbContext object, and the garbage collector determines that both o and the dbContext object are still reachable, then that object will be kept alive. However, the object would still be disposed once execution exits the using block normally.

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db will be around until it goes out of scope, all references to it are lost, and the GC decides to swoop in. Calling Dispose does not cleanup the object itself, it tells the object to clean up any native resources that it is holding onto.

The IDisposable interface is all about managing native resources which cannot be managed by the GC. The object itself is a managed object that is taken care of by the GC. In your example this object likely maintains a connection to a database which is a native resource.

The GC cannot clean this up, so in order to deterministically manage this memory/resource the class implements IDisposable to tell clients "hey, you need to do a bit of extra work to ensure that the resources I need to do my job are taken care of in as efficient a manner as possible."

Incidentally, a correct implementation of IDisposable will release any native resources in the finalizer, so you shouldn't experience a memory leak if you fail to call Dispose. However, this is non-deterministic and you may very well experience problems by doing so. Good practice dictates that you release these resources as soon as possible, which is why you call Dispose yourself.

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The object could be alive from a GC point of view after the end of the using block, but it will be disposed. In your second example, if db.objects.find(1) returned a reference to db (which would be odd indeed), you'd have something like this:

object o;
using (dbContext db = new dbContext())
{
    o = db;
}
// at this point in the code, the object is disposed, but referenced by the variable o; the object is therefore not yet eligible for garbage collection.
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Is it possible that o can keep db alive?

Alive in the sense of not being collected: Yes.

But a using() {} block implies Dispose() and that implies Close() so you won't be able to use it for anything meaningful anymore.

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using guarantees that IDisposable.Dispose will be called on the target object when execution moves out of the using block. This will happen always, no matter what.

It's unclear what you mean that o might keep db alive -- db will be disposed, so you will probably get an ObjectDisposedException if you try to use it afterwards. Does that count as "dead"? If yes, then it's dead, Jim.

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Setting an object to a particular instance does not keep database connections alive. Now, technically, it does not really dispose, as there is a pool to keep these expensive objects alive, but from your standpoint it works the same way as a disposed object and it does call the Dispose() method.

If you actually set o = db, it would be a different story, but you are dealing with result sets.

NEW: One more thing. Depending on how Dispose() is actually implemented, you might see an exception if the object cannot be disposed of.

BTW, the using statement is essentially the same as this (compile both and examine with reflector if you doubt):

try
{
   var myObject = new MyObject();
}
finally
{
   myObject.Dispose();
}
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the using construct is equivalent to a try-finally block:

dbContext db = new dbContext();
try
{
   o = db.objects.find(1);
}
finally
{
   db.Dispose();
}

In most cases of normal program execution, db.Dispose() will be called. However, that does not mean that db will not still be a valid object in memory. As Ed said in his answer, Dispose() does not actually remove the object from the heap and free the memory. That happens only when the object currently referenced by the variable db loses all references (because they have gone out of scope or been reassigned) and the GC removes it.

However, a disposed object is generally not very useful to keep around in memory; Dispose() is usually the end of the road before the object goes out of scope and is GCed. So evcen though you CAN keep db around by creating or assigning a reference to it to another variable, you will likely cause errors due to the object having closed its connections, freed unmanaged resources like COM references or sockets, and generally prepared itself to be removed from memory with the call to Dispose().

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No, db will always be disposed.

Do not mix the concept of disposing an object and an object being collected by the GC. Disposing is a tool to free up resources used by the object, but you can always keep a live reference to a disposed object which will keep the object from being collected. One does not exclude the other.

The Dispose pattern is just a way to deterministically free up resources, even if the object is not collected by the GC (which will be done when there are no live references and when the GC decides to collect the object which cannot be known beforehand unless you explicitly call GC.Collect).

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To add one more point of view to all responses ("disposed" vs "garbage collected").

Some objects have internal caching of resources that managed in part by IDisposable pattern. I.e. you can create a type that manages access to a particular file. Each instance will read/write portion of the file, but Dispose of one of many instances will not close file till very last instance associated with the file is disposed.

Since "using" don't do any magical things it will follow object's contract on "close resources" part, but it may not necessary mean "the special resource now free". So after using object is definitely "disposed", may be "alive" from GC point of view, and actual resource that the object manages may or may not be released (i.e. unloaded from memory/native handles closed).

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