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I am not sure if I am missing on some basic rules of programming or some basic rules of using PyCassa!

The problem is: I need to query cassandra to display all the rows with column5(name of the column) with value 5. I am able to print this result within the for loop, but not outside. My current code is:

expr2 = create_index_expression('column5', '5')
clause2 = create_index_clause([expr2], count=20)
for keyx, colx in col_fam.get_indexed_slices(clause):
      print colx

This works, but what does not work is:

expr2 = create_index_expression('column5', '5')
clause2 = create_index_clause([expr2], count=20)
for keyx, colx in col_fam.get_indexed_slices(clause):
    t = colx
    # ...
print t

I do understand to some, this question might sound too kiddish... but believe me, I am banging my head on this since last weekend, and now when left with no other option, I am here on Stackoverflow!

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Define "does not work." Do you get an error? Do you get something other than what you expect? –  kindall Feb 23 '12 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

Just to expand on the first answer, this is one compact way to get the output OrderedDictionaries as arrays (lists).

And I left out the count=20 because you said you want all the rows.

expr2 = create_index_expression('column5', '5')
clause2 = create_index_clause([expr2])

output = [colx.items() for keyx, colx in col_fam.get_indexed_slices(clause2)]

Or keeping the for loop notation,

expr2 = create_index_expression('column5', '5')
clause2 = create_index_clause([expr2])
output = []

for keyx, colx in col_fam.get_indexed_slices(clause2):
    output.append (colx.items()) 

And yes I second that python arrays (lists) use [] notation and not {}.

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In the first example, t is printed in every iteration which results in one row for each record meeting the criteria. In the second, t is replaced during each iteration so only the final value is printed. If you just want to print it, you can indent the print statement to make it part of the loop though the first example would work for that. If you want to save it in a list create a list and append colx to it in each iteration:

expr2 = create_index_expression('column5', '5')
clause2 = create_index_clause([expr2], count=20)
t=[]
for keyx, colx in col_fam.get_indexed_slices(clause):
    t.append(colx)
print t
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It does wonders! But any solution for turning the OrderedDict to a simple and useful array? This given query returns about 10 columns as specified. –  yuvrajm Feb 23 '12 at 8:33
    
Do you mean that you want to preserve keyx but not in a dict? t.append((keyx,colx)) creates a list of tuples. What are you trying to do? –  ABS Feb 23 '12 at 8:42
    
I just need to have a simple array like {} –  yuvrajm Feb 23 '12 at 9:28
    
Which columns do you want in the array? Note that {} is a dict or set in python. –  ABS Feb 23 '12 at 9:33
    
the result colx in the given code needs to be in an array, eg, {{col1,...colx}, {col1,...colx}......} –  yuvrajm Feb 23 '12 at 9:56

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