Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
var problemtest = function () {

    var parameters;

    return function (parameters) {
        parameters = parameters;
    }
}

var mysolutiontest = function () {

    var parameters;

    return function (parametersIn) {
        parameters = parametersIn;
    }
}

This is more of a JavaScript convention question.

Usually I have code similar to that on top. A function take arguments and assigns it to parent scope. However, I cannot use it as in problemtest, as the parameters that are arguments hide the parameters from problemtest.

In OO Programming we can use this, but in JavaScript I cannot use this, so I usually implement a solution similar to mysolutiontest. However, I am not fully satisfied with this solution. Is there a better way of doing this?

share|improve this question

If your functions need to share some properties, then assigning them to an object is an elegant and common pattern:

var object = {

    property: ['item'],

    methodOne: function() {
        console.log(this.property);
    },

    methodTwo: function() {
        console.log(this.property); 
    }

};

object.methodOne(); // ['item']
object.methodTwo(); // ['item']

For further information on how 'this' works within an object - http://javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/understanding-javascripts-this/

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but you should probably point out that using this.property can cause unexpected behavior to those not familiar with how JS objects work. Example: use object.methodOne as an event handler. – Lior Cohen Feb 23 '12 at 0:30
    
Agreed. Have edited and added Angus Croll's excellent post on the topic – Simon Smith Feb 23 '12 at 0:33
    
@LiorCohen—<... onclick="function(){object.methodOne();}"...>. – RobG Feb 23 '12 at 1:22
    
@RobG I believe Lior was referring more to using an individual method as an event handler with something like element.addEventListener('click', object.methodOne); In this instance the context of 'this' would be the element, and not the object as expected. – Simon Smith Feb 23 '12 at 1:36
    
Yes, and I was showing a simple method of setting this to the expected value, which can also be used with addEventListener or attachEvent: element.addEventListener('click', function(){object.methodOne()}); . It is also possible to use call or apply. – RobG Feb 23 '12 at 2:03

I usually use _parameters as a convention. This stems from my Java past. This isn't isolated to your example or to Javascript. Any language that does not force you to qualify the variables of any enclosing scope would lead you to the same problem.

var mysolutiontest = function () {
  var _parameters;

  return function (parameters) {
    _parameters = parameters;
  }
}

I've also seen people use p_parameters to quality function argument names. This is not one of my favorites tho.

var mysolutiontest = function () {
  var parameters;

  return function (p_parameters) {
    parameters = p_parameters;
  }
}

My 2c.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.