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I need to create a makefile that will compile my simpleprogram.c to sp and it can be called like unix commands like ls,ps etc, without writing explicitly ./sp. I looked upon the web and cannot find a solution, or searching it in a wrong way. I cannot search like "executable without ./" , because I do not know what is this called => "./"

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It's ps or sp? –  asaelr Feb 23 '12 at 0:37
    
@asaelr ps is an example, from unix commands, the one that shows processes. sp is the thing i want, making simpleprgram.c to complile to sp that can be used by just typing sp in that folder. –  Mustafa Feb 23 '12 at 0:44
    
Oops, I misreading this. :) –  asaelr Feb 23 '12 at 0:48
1  
. is called the current directory or working directory or current working directory, which is also the reason behind commands like cwd (in FTP) and pwd (on shell). –  jørgensen Feb 23 '12 at 5:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Put the binary in a directory that's in your PATH.

http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/cs348/unix_path.html

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But when I am in the same directory with it, shouldn't it work? –  Mustafa Feb 23 '12 at 0:38
    
No, only with ./sp if you're in the same directory. –  James McLaughlin Feb 23 '12 at 0:38
    
What was that quote about those who fail to study history being doomed to repeat its mistakes? –  R.. Feb 23 '12 at 0:46

Just copy your program to your systems bin (executable binaries) directory.

Most commonly its /usr/bin for programs which can be used by all user.

If the app is only for admins, you should use /usr/sbin/ directory.

Remember to set the "executable" flag with chmod: chmod +x your_app

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The proper solution to this (assuming you don't want sp to be run from outside of your makefile) is to call your program using the full path name instead of ./ (which is relative, and can change during multi-directory makes). In your makefile do something like:

SP_DIR := $(shell pwd)/spdir

rule : somedependency
    $(SP_DIR)/sp

Where $(shell pwd) will expand to the directory the makefile is being run from. If your sp directory is in a parent directory of this, it is possible to use .. in the path as well: eg.

SP_DIR := $(shell pwd)/../../spdir

If you do want to run sp from outside of the makefile, then you need to either copy sp to a directory specified in your PATH variable (do echo $PATH to see these), or modify your .bashrc or equivalent file to make PATH include the directory that sp is built in.

John

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You can just do:

export PATH=$PATH:.

But this is not a good idea, in general.

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1  
As you note, this is not a good idea. Indeed, I'd note that this is a truly terrible idea. :) –  Perry Mar 1 '12 at 20:15

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