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What's the preferred way to do command substitution in bash?

I've always done it like this:

echo "Hello, `whoami`."

But recently, I've often seen it written like this:

echo "Hello, $(whoami)."

What's the preferred syntax, and why? Or are they pretty much interchangeable?

I tend to favor the first, simply because my text editor seems to know what it is, and does syntax highlighting appropriately.

I read here that escaped characters act a bit differently in each case, but it's not clear to me which behavior is preferable, or if it just depends on the situation.

Side question: Is it bad practice to use both forms in one script, for example when nesting command substitutions?

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As a side note: the example does not work :) You should use: echo "Hello, $(whoami)"'!' (because of the use of the exclamation mark) –  rmuller May 13 '13 at 8:09
    
@rmuller, that's what I get for not testing examples. Changed it to a period. :) –  Dagg Nabbit May 13 '13 at 9:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 74 down vote accepted

There are several questions/issues here, so I'll repeat each section of the poster's text, block-quoted, and followed by my response.

What's the preferred syntax, and why? Or are they pretty much interchangeable?

I would say that the $(some_command) form is preferred over the `some_command` form. The second form, using a pair of backquotes (the "`" character, also called a backtick and a grave accent), is the historical way of doing it. The first form, using dollar sign and parentheses, is a newer POSIX form, which means it's probably a more standard way of doing it. In turn, I'd think that that means it's more likely to work correctly with different shells and with different *nix implementations.

Another reason given for preferring the first (POSIX) form is that it's easier to read, especially when command substitutions are nested. Plus, with the backtick form, the backtick characters have to be backslash-escaped in the nested (inner) command substitutions.

With the POSIX form, you don't need to do that.

As far as whether they're interchangeable, well, I'd say that, in general, they are interchangeable, apart from the exceptions you mentioned for escaped characters. However, I don't know and cannot say whether all modern shells and all modern *nixes support both forms. I doubt that they do, especially older shells/older *nixes. If I were you, I wouldn't depend on interchangeability without first running a couple of quick, simple tests of each form on any shell/*nix implementations that you plan to run your finished scripts on.

I tend to favor the first, simply because my text editor seems to know what it is, and does syntax highlighting appropriately.

It's unfortunate that your editor doesn't seem to support the POSIX form; maybe you should check to see if there's an update to your editor that supports the POSIX way of doing it. Long shot maybe, but who knows? Or, maybe you should even consider trying a different editor.

GGG, what text editor are you using???

I read here that escaped characters act a bit differently in each case, but it's not clear to me which behavior is preferable, or if it just depends on the situation.

I'd say that it depends on what you're trying to accomplish; in other words, whether you're using escaped characters along with command substitution or not.

Side question: Is it bad practice to use both forms in one script, for example when nesting command substitutions?

Well, it might make the script slightly easier to READ (typographically speaking), but harder to UNDERSTAND! Someone reading your script (or YOU, reading it six months later!) would likely wonder why you didn't just stick to one form or the other--unless you put some sort of note about why you did this in the comments. Plus, mixing both forms in one script would make that script less likely to be portable: In order for the script to work properly, the shell that's executing it has to support BOTH forms, not just one form or the other.

For making a shell script understandable, I'd personally prefer sticking to one form or the other throughout any one script, unless there's a good technical reason to do otherwise. Moreover, I'd prefer the POSIX form over the older form; again, unless there's a good technical reason to do otherwise.

For more on the topic of command substitution, and the two different forms for doing it, I suggest you refer to the section on command substitution in the O'Reilly book "Classic Shell Scripting," second edition, by Robbins and Beebe. In that section, the authors state that the POSIX form for command substitution "is recommended for all new development." I have no financial interest in this book; it's just one I have (and love) on shell scripting, though it's more for intermediate or advanced shell scripting, and not really for beginning shell scripting.

-B.

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I'm just now reading this, but if you put a > at the beginning of quoted lines, usenet-style, it'll put them in a nice blockquote. –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 23 '12 at 3:01
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Wow... I'm blown away by the thoroughness of this answer. I usually use gedit for day-to-day things; it bolds the stuff between the backquotes. –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 23 '12 at 3:09

You can read the differences from bash manual. At most case, they are interchangeable.


One thing to mention is that you should escape backquote to nest commands:

$ echo $(echo hello $(echo word))
hello word    

$ echo `echo hello \`echo word\``
hello word

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It gets really ugly when you have a third level of nesting with backticks. Just stick with the $() form –  glenn jackman Feb 23 '12 at 1:38
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For this reason I often use backticks for the first level and $() for more nesting. –  Kevin Feb 23 '12 at 2:46
    
@Kevin that's what I've been doing lately, but after seeing Bruce's answer I feel like I should switch :) –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 23 '12 at 3:13
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@glennjackman What, you don't like the length your commands to increase exponentially? echo ` echo \` echo \\\` echo \\\\\\\` whoami \\\\\\\` \\\` \` ` (editing for markdown was equally nightmarish.) –  ceykooo Feb 25 '13 at 23:18
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Upvoted for going through the markdown pain. :-) –  cdunn2001 Jun 30 '13 at 17:05

The backticks are compatible with ancient shells, and so scripts that need to be portable (such as GNU autoconf snippets) should prefer them.

The $() form is a little easier on the eyes, esp. after a few levels of escaping.

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"after a few levels of escaping" ... how do you escape the second level of backticks? \\`? I've never been that far down the rabbit hole I guess ;) –  Dagg Nabbit Feb 23 '12 at 2:59
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The trick is to realize that the back slashes themselves must be escaped: echo `echo \`echo \\\`pwd\\\`\`` –  phs Feb 23 '12 at 3:49

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