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I want to read in a file with some symbols like "!" and "^" and would like to remove them before I compare them with other strings from another line. If both strings are the same after removing the symbols, I want to store them in another hash called "common". For example... FileA:

hello!world
help?!3233
oh no^!!
yes!

FileB:

hello
help?
oh no
yes

In this case, FileA and FileB should be identical as I am comparing characters up to the place where "!" or "^" appears. I read the files by using the following code:

open FILEA, "< script/".$fileA or die;
my %read_file;
while (my $line=<FILEA>) {
   (my $word1,my $word2) = split /\n/, $line;
   $word1 =~ s/(!.+)|(!.*)|(\^.+)|(\^.*)//;#to remove ! and ^
   $read_file{$word1} = $word1;
}
close(FILEA);

I printed out the keys in the hash and it shows the correct result (ie. it converts FileA to "hello, help?, oh no, yes). However, when I do a comparison of FileA and FileB using the following code, it always fails.

while(($key,$value)=each(%config))
{
    $num=keys(%base_config);
    $num--;#to get the correct index
    while($num>=0)
    {
        $common{$value}=$value if exists $read_file{$key};#stored the correct matches in %common
        $num--;
    }
}

I tried to test my substitution and comparing between 2 strings using the following example and it works. I don't know why is it not working for reading strings into a hash from a file.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $str="hello^vsd";
my $test="hello";
$str =~ s/(!.+)|(!.*)|(\^.+)|(\^.*)//;
my %hash=();
$hash{$str}=();
foreach my $key(keys %hash)
{
    print "$key\n";
}
print "yay\n" if exists $hash{$test};
print "boo\n" unless exists $hash{$test};

Both files can have different number of lines of text and the lines of text need not be in the same order when searching. ie. "oh no" can come before "hello".

share|improve this question
    
can you assume that each line in file A should only be compared to the corresponding line in file B? and that file A and file B have an equal number of lines? –  ardnew Feb 23 '12 at 3:20
    
No. FileA and FileB can have different number of lines and the lines need not be in the same order. –  Sakura Feb 23 '12 at 4:05

4 Answers 4

Here's another solution that reads both files simultaneously (assumes both files have an equal number of lines):

use strict;
use warnings;

our $INVALID = '!\^'; #regexp character class, must escape

my $fileA = "file1.txt";
my $fileB = "file2.txt";

sub readl
{
  my $fh = shift;
  my $ln = "";

  if ($fh and $ln = <$fh>)
  {
    chomp $ln;
    $ln =~ s/[$INVALID]+.*//g;
  }

  return $ln;
}

my ($fhA, $fhB);
my ($wdA, $wdB);
my %common = ();

open $fhA, $fileA or die "$!\n";
open $fhB, $fileB or die "$!\n";

while ($wdA = readl($fhA) and $wdB = readl($fhB))
{
  $common{$wdA} = undef if $wdA eq $wdB;
}

print "$_\n" foreach keys %common;

Output

andrew@gidget:comparefiles$ cat file1.txt 
hello!world
help?!3233
oh no^!!
yes!

andrew@gidget:comparefiles$ cat file2.txt 
hello
help?
oh no
yes

andrew@gidget:comparefiles$ perl comparefiles.pl 
yes
oh no
hello
help?
share|improve this answer

Start by packaging up reusable segments into subroutines:

sub read_file {
    open my $fh, "<", $_[0] or die "read_file($_[0]) error: $!";
      # lexical handles auto-close when they fall out of scope
      # and detailed error messages are good
    my %file;
    while (my $line = <$fh>) {
        chomp $line;          # remove newline
        $line =~ s{[!^].*}{}; # remove everything starting from ! or ^
        $file{$line}++;
    }
    \%file
}

read_file takes an input file name and returns a hash of the line segments before any ! or ^ characters. Each line segment is a key, and the value is the number of times it appeared.

Using this, the next step is to figure out which lines match between files:

my ($fileA, $fileB) = map {read_file $_} your_file_names_here();

my %common;
$$fileA{$_} and $common{$_}++ for keys %$fileB;

print "common: $_\n" for keys %common;

Which will print:

common: yes
common: oh no
common: hello
common: help?

You could define your_file_names_here as follows if you wanted to test it:

sub your_file_names_here {\(<<'/A', <<'/B')}
hello!world
help?!3233
oh no^!!
yes!
/A
hello
help?
oh no
yes
/B
share|improve this answer
    
Hi. I just started learning Perl and don't quite understand "my ($fileA, $fileB) = map {read_file $_} your_file_names_here();" Can you explain further? –  Sakura Feb 23 '12 at 8:42
    
map applies a transform to a list and returns the transformed list. It is the same as my $fileA = read_file('filea.txt'); my $fileB = read_file('fileb.txt'); if the list ('filea.txt', 'fileb.txt') was returned by the your_file_names_here placeholder. –  Eric Strom Feb 23 '12 at 13:57

You can use regex character classes s/[?^]//g to remove ^ and ?, note that the ^ needs to be the last in the group, or you need to escape it. (might be safer to escape it, in case you add other characters later, so they don't get negated).

I process all the files, using the hash to calculate which file the word exists.

To compare the differences, I use 2**( # of file) so I get values 2**0=1, 2**1=2, 2**2=4, and so on. I use to show which file the strings belong to. If they exist in all they will be equal the total files, so 2 in this case - 3 (2+1) means they are in both files, 1 means FileA only, 2 means FileB. You check this by doing bitwise and (&).

Edit: added the test conditions

<!-- language: perl -->

my @files = qw(FileA.txt FileB.txt);
my %words;
foreach my $i (0 .. $#files) {
    my $file = $files[$i];
    open(FILE,$file) or die "Error: missing file $file\n$!\n";
    while (<FILE>) {
        chomp;
        next if /^$/;
        my ($word) = split /[!\^]/;
        $word =~ s/[?\^]//g; # removes ^ and ?
        $words{$word} += 2**$i;
    }
    close(FILE);
}

my %common;
foreach my $key (sort keys %words) {
    my @found;
    foreach my $i (0 .. $#files) {
        if ( $words{$key} & 2**$i ) { push @found, $files[$i] }
    }
    if ( $words{$key} & 2**$#files ) { $common{$key}++ }
    printf "%10s %d: @found\n",$key,$words{$key};
}

my @tests = qw(hello^vsd chuck help? test marymary^);
print "\nTesting Words: @tests\n";
foreach (@tests) {
    my ($word) = split /[!\^]/;
    $word =~ s/[?\^]//g; # removes ^ and ?
    if ( exists $common{ $word } ) {
        print "Found: $word\n";
    }
    else {
        print "Cannot find: $word\n";
    }
}

Output:

    bahbah 2: FileB.txt
   chucker 1: FileA.txt
     hello 3: FileA.txt FileB.txt
      help 3: FileA.txt FileB.txt
  marymary 2: FileB.txt
     oh no 3: FileA.txt FileB.txt
      test 1: FileA.txt
       yes 3: FileA.txt FileB.txt

Testing Words: hello^vsd chuck help? test marymary^
Found: hello
Cannot find: chuck
Found: help
Cannot find: test
Found: marymary
share|improve this answer

First we must normalize your input. The code below creates one hash for each path. For each line in a given file, remove everything beginning with the first ! or ^ character and record its presence.

sub read_inputs {
  my @result;

  foreach my $path (@_) {
    my $data = {};

    open my $fh, "<", $path or die "$0: open $path: $!";
    while (<$fh>) {
      chomp;
      s/[!^].*//;  # don't put the caret first without escaping!
      ++$data->{$_};
    }

    push @result, $data;
  }

  wantarray ? @result : \@result;
}

Computing the intersection of two arrays is covered in the Data Manipulation section of the Perl FAQ list. Adapting the technique to your situation, we want to know the lines that are common to all inputs.

sub common {
  my %matches;
  for (@_) {
    ++$matches{$_} for keys %$_;
  }

  my @result = grep $matches{$_} == @_, keys %matches;
  wantarray ? @result : \@result;
}

Tying it together with

my @input = read_inputs "FileA", "FileB";
my @common = common @input;
print "$_\n" for sort @common;

gives output of

hello
help?
oh no
yes
share|improve this answer

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