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I am using wxWigets, but I suppose this question is more of how to implement callbacks that are virtual functions. This is a (very) simplified version of my code:

// MyGUI.h 
Class MyGUI : public wxFrame {

  ...
  protected:
     virtual void onFeedButton_cb( wxCommandEvent& event ) { event.Skip(); }
  ...
}

// Animal.h 
Class Animal {

  public: 
       void Feed(); 
}

A trivial question: How do I implement the onFeedButton_cb callback so that it can access Animal's Feed() function?? i.e. during run time the callback must have access to an instance of Animal.

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How is onFeedButton_cb supposed to know which Animal to Feed()? Is there only one Animal, or perhaps an AnimalManager that knows all animals? –  krlmlr Feb 23 '12 at 2:13
    
Yup in other words I have no idea how to tell the callback which animal to feed. I only intend to create one instance of Animal in this case. –  dr_rk Feb 23 '12 at 2:15
    
On which condition does it depend which animal you feed? –  krlmlr Feb 23 '12 at 2:17
    
Lets say there is just one instance of animal, so only one instance to choose from? –  dr_rk Feb 23 '12 at 2:19
    
@dr_rk: You'd still need to provide a pointer to or reference to that instance somehow. –  Billy ONeal Feb 23 '12 at 2:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Define a non-virtual function that calls the virtual function for you, and attach the non-virtual function to the callback.

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class Animal { virtual void Roar() { std::cout << "Roar!\n"; } };
class Rabbit : public class Animal { virtual void Roar() {
    std::cout << "Rabbits don't roar, silly!\n"; } };

typedef void (*NonVirtualCallbackType)(Animal *);

void Callback(Animal *foo)
{
    //Virtual call happens inside the callback
    foo->Roar();
}

void FunctionUsingCallback(NonVirtualCallbackType callback, Animal *instance)
{
    callback(instance);
}

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<Animal> generals(new Animal());
    std::unique_ptr<Animal> wabbits(new Rabbit());
    FunctionUsingCallback(Callback, generals);
    FunctionUsingCallback(Callback, wabbits);
}

Note that this kind of conversion is exactly what std::mem_fun does under the covers for STL functors, though it relies on compile time rather than runtime polymorphism.

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Sorry didnt quite understand. Can you provide an example please? –  dr_rk Feb 23 '12 at 2:12
    
@dr_rk: Added. Make sense? –  Billy ONeal Feb 23 '12 at 2:17
    
Intriguing .. but why are we manually invoking the callback in main(). In my example, the event manager (i.e. when the button is clicked) invokes the callback (in this case roar()). –  dr_rk Feb 23 '12 at 2:28
    
@dr_rk: then you have to figure out how to get the event manager to pass an instance of the class to call the function on. (Calling a virtual method requires at least one argument - the this pointer, which presumably the event manager won't be able to fill in on it's own). That's got nothing to do with how callbacks work and everything to do with how how virtual methods work. The whole point of a virtual member function is to have some behavior chosen based on type... so you have to supply the object with the type at the call site. There's nothing magical about callbacks making that go away. –  Billy ONeal Feb 23 '12 at 3:12

Given the explanations in your comments, it seems you need to:

  • make the code in MyGUI.h aware of Animal

  • define a global storage for a pointer to the only Animal instance

Perhaps something like this:

// MyGUI.h 
#include "Animal.h"

Class MyGUI : public wxFrame {

  ...
  protected:
     virtual void onFeedButton_cb( wxCommandEvent& event ) {
        Animal::getTheAnimal()->Feed();
        event.Skip(); }
  ...
}

// Animal.h 
Class Animal {
  private:
       static Animal* theAnimal;

  public:
       static Animal& getTheAnimal() { return *theAnimal; }

  public:
       Animal() { theAnimal = this; }

  public: 
       void Feed(); 
}

See also the Singleton pattern.

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I don't see why the OP needs to use a singleton here. What's wrong with a global std::unique_ptr<Animal>? –  Billy ONeal Feb 23 '12 at 3:12

What worked for me was this:

class MyGUIChild : public MyGUI {
    Animal* animal_ptr; 

    void onFeedButton_cb( wxCommandEvent& event ) { 
        animal_ptr->feed(); 
    }
 }
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