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Edit: Solution at the bottom of this post.

Colorizing Get-Childitem (dir or ls, in other words) isn't a new idea exactly, but I have not been able to locate any ideal approaches to colorizing output in Powershell. There are two general approaches for writing color-ls functions:

  • Intercepting output of Get-Childitem, and re-outputting it as text using Write-Host with the -ForegroundColor parameter. This approach allows as much granularity as possible, but reduces the output of Get-Childitem to text. As most powershell users are aware, Get-Childitem does not output text, rather, it outputs objects. Specifically, a list of FileInfo and DirectoryInfo objects. This allows a great deal of flexibility in handling Get-Childitem output.

  • Pipe the output of Get-Childitem via Invoke-Expression to Foreach-Object, changing the console foreground color before outputting each object. Kind of a mouthful, but the better option because it preserves the type of Get-Childitem's output.

Here is an example of the latter approach, provided by Tim Johnson's Powershell Blog.

function color-ls
{
    $regex_opts = ([System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions]::IgnoreCase `
          -bor [System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions]::Compiled)
    $fore = $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor
    $compressed = New-Object System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(
          '\.(zip|tar|gz|rar|jar|war)$', $regex_opts)
    $executable = New-Object System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(
          '\.(exe|bat|cmd|py|pl|ps1|psm1|vbs|rb|reg)$', $regex_opts)
    $text_files = New-Object System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(
          '\.(txt|cfg|conf|ini|csv|log|xml|java|c|cpp|cs)$', $regex_opts)

    Invoke-Expression ("Get-ChildItem $args") | ForEach-Object {
        if ($_.GetType().Name -eq 'DirectoryInfo') 
        {
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = 'Magenta'
            echo $_
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = $fore
        }
        elseif ($compressed.IsMatch($_.Name)) 
        {
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = 'darkgreen'
            echo $_
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = $fore
        }
        elseif ($executable.IsMatch($_.Name))
        {
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = 'Red'
            echo $_
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = $fore
        }
        elseif ($text_files.IsMatch($_.Name))
        {
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = 'Yellow'
            echo $_
            $Host.UI.RawUI.ForegroundColor = $fore
        }
        else
        {
            echo $_
        }
    }
}

This code assigns different colors based purely on file extension, but nearly any metric could be substituted to differentiate file types. The above code produces the following output:

Colored get-childitem example

This is nearly perfect, but there is one little flaw: the first 3 lines output (Directory path, Column Headers, and horizontal separators) take on the color of the first item in the list. Tim Johnson commented in his blog:

I would rather if the header at the top wasn't always the same color as the first item, but I can't think of any way around that.

Neither can I, unfortunately. That's where Stack Overflow and its powershell gurus come in: I'm looking for a way to colorize Get-Childitem output while preserving the cmdlet's output type, without messing up the color of the header. I've done some experimentation and fiddling with this approach, but have not had any success just yet, as the first single echo call outputs the entire header and first item.

Any questions, comments, or, even better, solutions are welcome.

The Solution With Thanks to jon Z and the others who provided ideas:

Jon Z provided the perfect solution to this problem, which I have polished up a bit to match the scheme in my original question. Here it is, for anyone who is interested. Note that this requires the New-CommandWrapper cmdlet from the Powershell Cookbook. All of this code goes in your profile.

function Write-Color-LS
    {
        param ([string]$color = "white", $file)
        Write-host ("{0,-7} {1,25} {2,10} {3}" -f $file.mode, ([String]::Format("{0,10}  {1,8}", $file.LastWriteTime.ToString("d"), $file.LastWriteTime.ToString("t"))), $file.length, $file.name) -foregroundcolor $color 
    }

New-CommandWrapper Out-Default -Process {
    $regex_opts = ([System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions]::IgnoreCase)


    $compressed = New-Object System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(
        '\.(zip|tar|gz|rar|jar|war)$', $regex_opts)
    $executable = New-Object System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(
        '\.(exe|bat|cmd|py|pl|ps1|psm1|vbs|rb|reg)$', $regex_opts)
    $text_files = New-Object System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(
        '\.(txt|cfg|conf|ini|csv|log|xml|java|c|cpp|cs)$', $regex_opts)

    if(($_ -is [System.IO.DirectoryInfo]) -or ($_ -is [System.IO.FileInfo]))
    {
        if(-not ($notfirst)) 
        {
           Write-Host
           Write-Host "    Directory: " -noNewLine
           Write-Host " $(pwd)`n" -foregroundcolor "Magenta"           
           Write-Host "Mode                LastWriteTime     Length Name"
           Write-Host "----                -------------     ------ ----"
           $notfirst=$true
        }

        if ($_ -is [System.IO.DirectoryInfo]) 
        {
            Write-Color-LS "Magenta" $_                
        }
        elseif ($compressed.IsMatch($_.Name))
        {
            Write-Color-LS "DarkGreen" $_
        }
        elseif ($executable.IsMatch($_.Name))
        {
            Write-Color-LS "Red" $_
        }
        elseif ($text_files.IsMatch($_.Name))
        {
            Write-Color-LS "Yellow" $_
        }
        else
        {
            Write-Color-LS "White" $_
        }

    $_ = $null
    }
} -end {
    write-host ""
}

This produces output that looks like the following screenshot: enter image description here

If you would like the total file size line at the bottom, simply add the following code:

Remove-Item alias:ls
Set-Alias ls LS-Padded

function LS-Padded
{
    param ($dir)
    Get-Childitem $dir
    Write-Host
    getDirSize $dir
}

function getDirSize
{
    param ($dir)
    $bytes = 0

    Get-Childitem $dir | foreach-object {

        if ($_ -is [System.IO.FileInfo])
        {
            $bytes += $_.Length
        }
    }

    if ($bytes -ge 1KB -and $bytes -lt 1MB)
    {
        Write-Host ("Total Size: " + [Math]::Round(($bytes / 1KB), 2) + " KB")   
    }

    elseif ($bytes -ge 1MB -and $bytes -lt 1GB)
    {
        Write-Host ("Total Size: " + [Math]::Round(($bytes / 1MB), 2) + " MB")
    }

    elseif ($bytes -ge 1GB)
    {
        Write-Host ("Total Size: " + [Math]::Round(($bytes / 1GB), 2) + " GB")
    }    

    else
    {
        Write-Host ("Total Size: " + $bytes + " bytes")
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Hello. Here are some relevant links: stackoverflow.com/a/8088587/539542 –  Nanda Feb 23 '12 at 7:34
    
The header and separator are not an output from get-childitem. It is just an additional info when a filesystemobject is displayed. So you probably have to edit FileSystem.format.ps1xml...if that's even possible –  Tom Feb 23 '12 at 8:25
    
Jon's solution is ideal. Once I get a well-tested and polished new version written, I'll put it in the OP for future reference. –  Fopedush Feb 23 '12 at 20:12
    
This blog has some modifications to this approach: avinmathew.com/coloured-directory-listings-in-powershell –  John Fouhy Aug 5 '13 at 5:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Modifying Out-Default is definitely the way to go. Below a - granted, sloppy - example. I'm using New-CommandWrapper from the PowerShell Cookbook.

New-CommandWrapper Out-Default `
    -Process {
        if(($_ -is [System.IO.DirectoryInfo]) -or ($_ -is [System.IO.FileInfo]))
        {if(-not ($notfirst)) {
           Write-Host "    Directory: $(pwd)`n"           
           Write-Host "Mode                LastWriteTime     Length Name"
           Write-Host "----                -------------     ------ ----"
           $notfirst=$true
           }
           if ($_ -is [System.IO.DirectoryInfo]) {
           Write-host ("{0,-7} {1,25} {2,10} {3}" -f $_.mode, ([String]::Format("{0,10}  {1,8}", $_.LastWriteTime.ToString("d"), $_.LastWriteTime.ToString("t"))), $_.length, $_.name) -foregroundcolor "yellow" }
           else {
           Write-host ("{0,-7} {1,25} {2,10} {3}" -f $_.mode, ([String]::Format("{0,10}  {1,8}", $_.LastWriteTime.ToString("d"), $_.LastWriteTime.ToString("t"))), $_.length, $_.name) -foregroundcolor "green" }
           $_ = $null
        }
} 

Example Directory Listing

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like the answer. I'll check back once I've had a chance to play with it a bit. –  Fopedush Feb 23 '12 at 16:24
    
Yes, this is definitely the answer. I've got some formatting issues to deal with no, but nothing I can't handle. Thanks! –  Fopedush Feb 23 '12 at 17:13
    
Here's a thought - is there any easy way to append a newline to the end of the output? (or, for example, add a total filesize row at the bottom?) I don't know how to programatically check if an entry is the last one. EDIT: I suppose i could just write a function that calls LS then writes a newline, and alias that function. No biggie. –  Fopedush Feb 24 '12 at 17:24
    
Just add -end {write-host ""} to the end. –  jon Z Feb 25 '12 at 6:59
    
See also this blogger's extension of this solution: avinmathew.com/coloured-directory-listings-in-powershell, but beware that you will probably want to move the regexes OUTSIDE of each function evaluation to avoid very nasty slowness. –  jhclark Apr 7 at 15:40

Maybe via an Out-Default proxy function.

share|improve this answer
    
Wrapping Out-Default can give a broader solution, haven't tried it my self but it looks like the right candidate. –  Shay Levy Feb 23 '12 at 8:37
    
I just created the stub for Out-Default and played with a bit. First time playing with proxies :-) I learned that $scriptCmd in the begin block has to be a single command so no logic allowed. Logic is allowed in the process block. I added $host.ui.rawui.foregroundground to the process block but it has the same problem where the Directory: at the top and the column headers are the same color as the dirs. Write-Host $_ -Fore Green in the process block just adds extra lines in the output. First time playing with this these though... Still learning... –  Andy Arismendi Feb 23 '12 at 9:03
    
@AndyArismendi - take a look: dmitrysotnikov.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/… –  CB. Feb 23 '12 at 10:16
    
@Christian I was using that as a guide :-) –  Andy Arismendi Feb 23 '12 at 10:20
    
I think the thing to change is how Out-Default does Console.WriteLine or Console.Write, changing the foreground just before a particular type of FileSystemInfo get's displayed. It looks like that code is internal to the cmdlet and not modifiable in the proxy. –  Andy Arismendi Feb 23 '12 at 10:41

I have another script which takes care of Format-Wide (ls) case and also has better performance by using dictionaries instead of regex: https://github.com/joonro/Get-ChildItem-Color.

share|improve this answer

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