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I would like to write a template that will determine if a type is an stl container at compile time.

I've got the following bit of code:

  struct is_cont{};
  struct not_cont{};

  template <typename T>
  struct is_cont { typedef not_cont result_t; };

but I'm not sure how to create the necessary specializations for std::vector<T,Alloc>, deque<T,Alloc>, set<T,Alloc,Comp> etc...

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3  
I would be curious to know why it needs to exactly be one of the standard library STL containers. Wouldn't it make sense to check the properties of the container, so that if something else conformed to those properties, it could be used without problems? –  Nicol Bolas Feb 23 '12 at 5:01
    
std::unordered_map wasn't in the STL, but it is now in C++11. Do you consider it an STL type? –  MSalters Feb 23 '12 at 12:00
    
@MSalters: It does meet the container requirements. –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '12 at 23:00
    
Once you've decided that a container is an STL container, what will you do? –  razeh May 1 '13 at 13:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

First, you define your general template, which will have a member which is false in the default case:

template <typename T>
struct is_cont {
  static const bool value = false;
};

Then you will define partial specializations for your container types which have a value of true instead:

template <typename T,typename Alloc>
struct is_cont<std::vector<T,Alloc> > {
  static const bool value = true;
};

Then for a type X that you want to check, use it like

if (is_cont<X>::value) { ... } 
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2  
I had the same approach, the problem is that STL containers have more than 1 template param eg: Alloc, Comp etc... –  Xander Tulip Feb 23 '12 at 5:06
    
Note that this will fail, if you provide non-default parameters to the vector. You should forward all template parameters, in order to be generic. –  bitmask Feb 23 '12 at 5:08
1  
True -- I've made my answer more generic. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 23 '12 at 5:09

Note: the following code is taken from an excellent utility called pretty-print written by @Kerrek SB (a topic on it at stackoverflow).

Disclaimer : I don't know if I'm allowed to copy and paste this code here without taking permission from the original author. @Kerrek, let me know if you've any issue. :-)


You can use this classs template:

  template<typename T> 
  struct is_container : std::integral_constant<bool, has_const_iterator<T>::value && has_begin_end<T>::beg_value && has_begin_end<T>::end_value> 
  { };

Usage:

 std::cout << is_container<std::vector<int>>::value << std::endl; //true
 std::cout << is_container<std::list<int>>::value << std::endl;   //true 
 std::cout << is_container<std::map<int>>::value << std::endl;    //true
 std::cout << is_container<std::set<int>>::value << std::endl;    //true
 std::cout << is_container<int>::value << std::endl;              //false

Note that is_container needs following helper class templates:

template<typename T>
struct has_const_iterator
{
private:
    typedef char                      yes;
    typedef struct { char array[2]; } no;

    template<typename C> static yes test(typename C::const_iterator*);
    template<typename C> static no  test(...);
public:
    static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
    typedef T type;
};

template <typename T>
struct has_begin_end
{
    template<typename C> static char (&f(typename std::enable_if<
      std::is_same<decltype(static_cast<typename C::const_iterator (C::*)() const>(&C::begin)),
      typename C::const_iterator(C::*)() const>::value, void>::type*))[1];

    template<typename C> static char (&f(...))[2];

    template<typename C> static char (&g(typename std::enable_if<
      std::is_same<decltype(static_cast<typename C::const_iterator (C::*)() const>(&C::end)),
      typename C::const_iterator(C::*)() const>::value, void>::type*))[1];

    template<typename C> static char (&g(...))[2];

    static bool const beg_value = sizeof(f<T>(0)) == 1;
    static bool const end_value = sizeof(g<T>(0)) == 1;
};
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Nice thing, but it will recognise non-std types that happen to follow std conventions (i.e. having iterators and begin/end pairs). This is not at all uncommon! –  bitmask Feb 23 '12 at 5:16
    
@bitmask: Yes, because it is completely generic.:-) –  Nawaz Feb 23 '12 at 5:17
1  
@Nawaz: That is a nice approach, but its a little more than what was required. –  Xander Tulip Feb 23 '12 at 5:20
    
No argument there. But genericity makes sense for the pretty-printer, yet is only suited as a mere heuristic for this question. –  bitmask Feb 23 '12 at 5:22
    
Doesnt work in Visual Studio 2012, always returns false –  Viktor Sehr Mar 10 at 14:35

Pursuing the suggestion that a generic compiletime test for has-an-stl-container-like-interface would be an appropriate solution, this one defines an stl-like container T by the interface:

T::iterator T::begin();
T::iterator T::end();
T::const_iterator T::begin() const;
T::const_iterator T::end() const;

*T::iterator is T::value_type &
*T::const_iterator is T::value_type const &

Additional requirements, e.g. a size() method, could be added in an obvious fashion, or other canonical type interfaces probed at compiletime in an obvious similar way.

#ifndef IS_STL_CONTAINER_LIKE_H
#define IS_STL_CONTAINER_LIKE_H

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
struct is_stl_container_like
{
    typedef typename std::remove_const<T>::type test_type;

    template<typename A>
    static constexpr bool test(
        A * pt,
        A const * cpt = nullptr,
        decltype(pt->begin()) * = nullptr,
        decltype(pt->end()) * = nullptr,
        decltype(cpt->begin()) * = nullptr,
        decltype(cpt->end()) * = nullptr,
        typename A::iterator * pi = nullptr,
        typename A::const_iterator * pci = nullptr,
        typename A::value_type * pv = nullptr) {

        typedef typename A::iterator iterator;
        typedef typename A::const_iterator const_iterator;
        typedef typename A::value_type value_type;
        return  std::is_same<decltype(pt->begin()),iterator>::value &&
                std::is_same<decltype(pt->end()),iterator>::value &&
                std::is_same<decltype(cpt->begin()),const_iterator>::value &&
                std::is_same<decltype(cpt->end()),const_iterator>::value &&
                std::is_same<decltype(**pi),value_type &>::value &&
                std::is_same<decltype(**pci),value_type const &>::value;

    }

    template<typename A>
    static constexpr bool test(...) {
        return false;
    }

    static const bool value = test<test_type>(nullptr);

};

#endif

Here is a test program, built with GCC 4.7.2, clang 3.2, Intel C++ 13.1.1:

#include "is_stl_container_like.h"

// Testing ...

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <array>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

template<class C>
struct polymorphic : private C
{
    typedef typename C::value_type value_type;
    typedef typename C::iterator iterator;
    typedef typename C::const_iterator const_iterator;

    virtual ~polymorphic(){}

    virtual const_iterator begin() const {
        return C::begin();
    }

    virtual iterator begin()  {
        return C::begin();
    }

    virtual const_iterator end() const {
        return C::end();
    }

    virtual iterator end()  {
        return C::end();
    }   
};

template<class C>
struct reject : private C
{
    typedef typename C::value_type value_type;
    typedef typename C::iterator iterator;
    typedef typename C::const_iterator const_iterator;


    const_iterator begin() {
        return C::begin();
    }

    iterator begin() const {
        return C::begin();
    }

    const_iterator end() {
        return C::end();
    }

    iterator end() const {
        return C::end();
    }
};

int main()
{
    cout << is_stl_container_like<vector<int> const >::value << endl; // Yes
    cout << is_stl_container_like<array<int,42>>::value << endl; // Yes
    cout << is_stl_container_like<polymorphic<vector<int>>>::value << endl; // Yes
    cout << is_stl_container_like<function<int(int)>>::value << endl; // No
    cout << is_stl_container_like<int>::value << endl; // No
    cout << is_stl_container_like<reject<vector<int>>>::value << endl; //No
}
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There is is_container in boost http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/libs/spirit/doc/html/spirit/advanced/customize/is_container.html

is_container<C>::type --- Result of the metafunction that evaluates to mpl::true_ if a given type, C, is to be treated as a container, mpl::false_ otherwise Generally, any implementation of is_container needs to behave as if if was a MPL Boolean Constant..

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2  
This looks like it's specifically an internal of the Boost Spirit parser library. It's not clear to me from the documentation whether it can be used as a more general determiner of container type, nor what exactly a positive response from this trait guarantees about that type! Maybe someone knows better... –  andybuckley Jan 7 '13 at 20:54

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