Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Okay, I'm sure there's something I'm missing here, but I have no idea what it is and I'm hoping someone could help me figure it out.

I'm reading in input from the command line and was writing a function that uses fgetc() to do so. However, a seemingly superficial change in the function causes it to behave completely differently.

This is the main() function:

while(1)
{
     char* cmd = malloc(sizeof(char) * 80);
     printf("Enter command: ");
     read_flush(cmd, 80);
     printf("%s\n", cmd);
     free(cmd);
}

And this is one of the versions of read_flush():

int read_flush(char* buffer, int count)
{
    int i, c;
    for(i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        c = fgetc(stdin);
        if(c == '\n' || c == EOF)
            return i;
        buffer[i] = (char)c;
    }

    return i;
}

This one works fine. You type in input and it will spit it back out. However, this next version causes main to just print "Enter command:" over and over without giving the user a chance to enter input.

int read_flush(char* buffer, int count)
{
    int i, c;
    while(i < count)    
    {
        c = fgetc(stdin);
        if(c == '\n' || c == EOF)
            return i;
        buffer[i] = (char)c;
        i++;
    }

    return i;
}

What subtlety with fgetc() am I missing here?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Try initializing i in your second read_flush implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, whoops. Yeah, that was all it was. –  user1227489 Feb 23 '12 at 5:28
    
It's good to get in the habit of always initializing your variables, especially when working with pointers. It will save you many headaches down the road. –  Adam S Feb 23 '12 at 14:41

In the second version it looks like you are not initializing i to zero like you do in the first version. So it could be starting with a garbage value larger than count, and thus the loop never executes.

share|improve this answer

Both versions have the same error. You don't add a NUL on the end of the string. malloc does not initialize the memory that it returns.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Very important point. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 23 '12 at 5:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.