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This is what I have so far:

while len(words) != 5:
        words = raw_input("Enter a 5 worded sentence: ").split()
        print "Try again. The word count is:", wordCount
if len(words) == 5:
        print "Good! The word count is 5!" 

The problem is I get this:

Enter a 5 worded sentence: d d d d
Try again. The word count is: 4
Enter a 5 worded sentence: d d d d d d 
Try again. The word count is: 4
Enter a 5 worded sentence: d d d d d 
Try again. The word count is: 4
Good! The word count is 5!

When I enter more or less than 5 words, it keeps that word count and doesn't change.

share|improve this question
    
Where are you initializing variable wordCount? –  husbas Feb 23 '12 at 5:39
    
I placed it before the while loop. wordCount=len(words) –  user1227404 Feb 23 '12 at 5:41
    
Make sure you post the actual code that generated your output. As is, your code will fail since words is not defined before testing the length. –  Mark Tolonen Feb 23 '12 at 5:59
    
double-post of stackoverflow.com/q/9407005/674039 –  wim Feb 23 '12 at 6:07

4 Answers 4

Since Python doesn't have a do-while loop like some other languages, this idiom prevents duplication of the raw_input function, and makes sure the loop runs at least once. Make sure to update word_count after getting new input.

while 1:
    words = raw_input("Enter a 5 worded sentence: ").split()
    word_count = len(words)
    if word_count == 5: break
    print "Try again. The word count is:", word_count
print "Good! The word count is 5!"
share|improve this answer
    
Could we please not teach beginners to write ugly things like while 1? –  Karl Knechtel Feb 23 '12 at 6:48
    
It's a common idiom. –  Mark Tolonen Feb 23 '12 at 7:03
    
That doesn't make it right. It's a gross violation of the Zen IMHO. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 23 '12 at 7:05
1  
while True is certainly an improvement in readability. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 23 '12 at 7:09
1  
In Python 2, while 1 generates a more efficient loop. In Python 3, it no longer makes a difference. –  Mark Tolonen Feb 23 '12 at 7:15

You just need to re-order some of your logic:

# prompt before entering loop
words = raw_input("Enter a 5 worded sentence: ").split()
while len(words) != 5:
        print "Try again. The word count is:", len(words)
        words = raw_input("Enter a 5 worded sentence: ").split()

# no need to test len again
print "Good! The word count is 5!" 
share|improve this answer

The variable wordCount should be updated inside the loop, after you accept the input. Only then it will reflect the new value. Something like this:-

while len(words) != 5:
    words = raw_input("Enter a 5 worded sentence: ").split()
    wordCount = len(words)
    print "Try again. The word count is:", wordCount
if len(words) == 5:
    print "Good! The word count is 5!" 
share|improve this answer

I think your code snippet is missing parts. Anyways, you should evaluate the wordCount after raw_input so that it gets updated with new values.

wordCount = 0
while wordCount != 5:
    words = raw_input("Enter a 5 worded sentence: ").split()
    wordCount = len(words)
    print "Try again. The word count is:", wordCount

print "Good! The word count is 5!" 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I forgot about that wordCount = 0. –  user1227404 Feb 23 '12 at 5:57
    
Well you may accept the answer if it is what you want. –  husbas Feb 23 '12 at 6:04

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