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The following program reads a file and it intends to store the all values (each line) into a variable but doesn't store the last line. Why?

file.txt :

   1
   2
   .
   .
   .
   n

Code :

 FileName=file.txt

if test -f $FileName         # Check if the file exists
    then
        while read -r line
        do    
            fileNamesListStr="$fileNamesListStr $line"

        done < $FileName
    fi

  echo "$fileNamesListStr"  // 1 2 3 ..... n-1 (but it should print up to n.)
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2  
Does your file end with a newline? –  jackrabbit Feb 23 '12 at 6:26
    
@jackrabbit: no. actually most of the client doesn't know and they write the file without ending with new line. therefore i'm looking for such solution which should work in both cases. –  user1010399 Feb 23 '12 at 7:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of reading line-by-line, why not read the whole file at once?

[ -f $FileName ] && fileNameListStr=$( tr '\n' ' ' < $FileName )
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1  
+1 By far the most elegant method! –  jackrabbit Feb 24 '12 at 6:31
    
simply superb & very efficient :) +100 –  user1010399 Feb 27 '12 at 9:35
    
also i wanted to give a notification if file is missing?? –  user1010399 Feb 27 '12 at 9:36
1  
@user1010399, then use an if statement with an else clause. –  glenn jackman Feb 27 '12 at 15:41
    
ok. thanks again. –  user1010399 Feb 28 '12 at 0:54

One probable cause is that there misses a newline after the last line n.

Use the following command to check it:

tail -1 file.txt

And the following fixes:

echo >> file.txt

If you really need to keep the last line without newline, I reorganized the while loop here.

#!/bin/bash
FileName=0
if test -f $FileName ; then
    while [ 1 ] ; do    
        read -r line
        if [ -z $line ] ; then
            break
        fi
        fileNamesListStr="$fileNamesListStr $line"
    done < $FileName
fi
echo "$fileNamesListStr"
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your time. if i use tail -1 file.txt then it returns the last line (n) either file ends with a new line or not, echo >> file.txt adds a new blank line at the end whether file ends with new line or not. so i don't think it's much useful in my case –  user1010399 Feb 23 '12 at 9:58
    
i want to check first, if file ends with a new line do nothing. else echo >> file.txt. –  user1010399 Feb 23 '12 at 9:59

The issue is that when the file does not end in a newline, read returns non-zero and the loop does not proceed. The read command will still read the data, but it will not process the loop. This means that you need to do further processing outside of the loop. You also probably want an array instead of a space separated string.

FileName=file.txt

if test -f $FileName         # Check if the file exists
    then
        while read -r line
        do    
            fileNamesListArr+=("$line")

        done < $FileName

        [[ -n $line ]] && fileNamesListArr+=("$line")
fi

echo "${fileNameListArr[@]}"

See the "My text files are broken! They lack their final newlines!" section of this article: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/001

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Thanks jordanm. it's working in both case either the file ends with new line or not. many thanks for your time & the solution you provided. –  user1010399 Feb 27 '12 at 3:12
    
which one is efficient space separated string Vs Array string in terms of memory space & accessing the stored data. –  user1010399 Feb 27 '12 at 3:14
1  
@user1010399 The benefit of my solution is that it can handle filenames in the file containing spaces, whereas the others can not. I am not sure on the RAM difference, but it is very likely negligible. If you are wanting to squeeze out a little less memory usage and speed, then you are using the wrong language. –  jordanm Feb 27 '12 at 13:58
    
+100 ! Thanks jordanm. basically i am a java programmer and don't have much idea about shell script. Thanks again. –  user1010399 Feb 28 '12 at 0:59

As a workaround, before reading from the text file a newline can be appended to the file.

echo "\n" >> $file_path

This will ensure that all the lines that was previously in the file will be read. Now the file can be read line by line.

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