Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

I have a Json array as below

 {
 "Level":{
      "@attributes":
        {
                "value":"","type":"RelyingParty","others":"false","id":"1"
        }
     },
   "Role":{
     "@attributes":
              {
             "uuid":"838f7ee2-f11c-48f9-887f-8e485b74169b","type":"ADMIN"
              }
     },
   "Timeline":"2012",
   "Timezone":"GMT+330"
  }

How can i parse the above json data using jquery and store it in a javascript array. Because i am new to json any help on this will be very useful for me.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Qantas 94 Heavy, David Rönnqvist, Samuel Liew, Sahil Mittal, dax Jul 9 '14 at 9:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Second result on Google: google.com/search?q=jquery+json – Will Vousden Feb 23 '12 at 7:00
    
That's a JSON object, actually an object fragment. Google JSON.parse() - that's all you need. – EdH Feb 23 '12 at 7:00
2  
how about doing some research first... – Asken Feb 23 '12 at 7:01
    
Did you try jQuery.parseJSON( data ) – Uriel_SVK Feb 23 '12 at 7:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you've quoted is not valid JSON, and even with a minimal modification, it wouldn't be an array. I suspect you just mean "object" (e.g., what PHP calls an associative array; really it's a map). What you've quoted looks like part of a JSON object definition, but it's missing the initial {.

jQuery offers jQuery.parseJSON for this very purpose:

var x = jQuery.parseJSON(strContainingJSON);

So adding the leading {, here it is:

str = '{' +
      '    "Level": {' +
      '        "@attributes": {' +
      '            "value": "",' +
      '            "type": "RelyingParty",' +
      '            "others": "false",' +
      '            "id": "1"' +
      '        }' +
      '    },' +
      '    "Role": {' +
      '        "@attributes": {' +
      '            "uuid": "838f7ee2-f11c-48f9-887f-8e485b74169b",' +
      '            "type": "ADMIN"' +
      '        }' +
      '    },' +
      '    "Timeline": "2012",' +
      '    "Timezone": "GMT+330"' +
      '}';
var x = jQuery.parseJSON(str);
console.log(x.Timeline); // "2012"

Of course, you probably get str from somewhere else (loading it from ajax or something), rather than directly in a string as in the above, but the end result is the same. Also note that if you are using ajax to load the JSON, if it's served with the correct MIME type, jQuery will parse it automatically, and then hand your ajax success function the resulting object.

If you really want an array (an ordered list), put [ at the beginning and ] at the end, creating a one-entry array containing the object:

str = '[' +
      '    {' +
      '        "Level": {' +
      '            "@attributes": {' +
      '                "value": "",' +
      '                "type": "RelyingParty",' +
      '                "others": "false",' +
      '                "id": "1"' +
      '            }' +
      '        },' +
      '        "Role": {' +
      '            "@attributes": {' +
      '                "uuid": "838f7ee2-f11c-48f9-887f-8e485b74169b",' +
      '                "type": "ADMIN"' +
      '            }' +
      '        },' +
      '        "Timeline": "2012",' +
      '        "Timezone": "GMT+330"' +
      '    }' +
      ']';
var x = jQuery.parseJSON(str);
console.log(x[0].Timeline); // "2012"
share|improve this answer
    
JSON starts and ends with { } as it's an object literal. [ ] are for arrays inside a JSON object. – Interrobang Feb 23 '12 at 7:04
    
I have formed the above json data using json_encode function php. it outputs only the above json data, – gowtham kumar Feb 23 '12 at 7:06
    
@Interrobang: No, see json.org. [1, 2, 3] is [valid JSON](jsonlint.com). The outermost structure can be an object or an array. – T.J. Crowder Feb 23 '12 at 7:07
    
Yes its an object literal – gowtham kumar Feb 23 '12 at 7:07
    
@gowthamkumar: You've left off the leading { at the least. – T.J. Crowder Feb 23 '12 at 7:08

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.