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I want to check if a string is an IPv4 or IPv6 address, but NOTHING else. Is there any way to accomplish this using standard java libs?

I know of:

  • InetAddress.getByName(str) - but it accepts hostnames
  • IPAddressUtil.isIPv4LiteralAddress(str) - but it is an internal class and will give compiler warnings

I know I could use regular expressions, but I prefer to use existing methods.

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I think we can agree that there is no standard (as in, included by default) way of accomplishing this. What I ended up doing was to run the supposed IP address through a sloppy IPv4|6 regexp (to sort out anything that does not look like a valid IP address) and then call InetAddress.getByName(str) on the address. –  honeyp0t Feb 28 '12 at 7:40
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3 Answers

You can use InetAddresses.forString(), from this library:

http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/source/browse/guava/src/com/google/common/net/InetAddresses.java

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That looks like a really nice class. –  Mike Feb 27 '12 at 17:30
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The way to do this in C is to use inet_pton(). You could port the code to Java. (Or use some really complicated regular expressions, because matching IPv6 addresses isn't simple.)

You could take a look at the regular expression in this question and change it so it doesn't match hostnames, if you're feeling brave. ;-)

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Simple rule of thumbs is if the address is x.x.x.x.x.x.x.x then its an IPV6 address...Try looking into the classes Inet4Address and Inet6Address as well.

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ITYM x:x:x:x:x:x:x:x –  glglgl Feb 23 '12 at 9:19
    
Sure, but then there's short forms (skipping zeroes), loopback address, etc. –  honeyp0t Feb 23 '12 at 9:23
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