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I am experimenting with JavaScript Inheritance. Basically, I am following this tutorial.

I see that, with the code there, the Person class is instantiated twice. Please have a look at this fiddle.

What I did is comment out:

Person.call(this)

And the inheritance is working just fine.

In the original code, the line

Person.call(this)

is used. Is there a need of calling parent constructor with child scope?

Could you please also give some explanation, I am new to OO JavaScript.

Thanks a lot.

EDIT:

My code in the fiddle is as follows:

function Person(gender) {
    this.gender = gender;
    document.write('Person instantiated</br>');
}

Person.prototype.walk = function(){
    document.write("is walking</br>");
};

Person.prototype.sayHello = function(){
    document.write("Hello</br>");
};

Person.prototype.sayGender = function(){
    document.write(this.gender + "</br>");
};



function Student() {
    //Person.call(this);
    document.write('Student instantiated</br>');        
}
Student.prototype = new Person();

Student.prototype.constructor = Student;

Student.prototype.sayHello = function(){
    document.write("Student says Hello</br>");
}
Student.prototype.sayGoodBye = function(){
    document.write("Student says goodbye</br>");
}


var student1 = new Student();
student1.sayHello();
student1.walk();
student1.sayGoodBye();

document.write(student1 instanceof Person);
document.write("</br>");
document.write(student1 instanceof Student);
share|improve this question
    
@T.J.Crowder: Sorry if the tone of my question had went wrong. I never meant to be rude. –  riship89 Feb 23 '12 at 9:00
    
@hrishikeshp19: No, I didn't think you did. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 23 '12 at 9:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Running the example you provided only calls the Person() constructor once during initial execution of the script when the line "Student.prototype = new Person();" is executed.

If we modify your script to create a second student and separate the setup from the instantiation: bit: http://jsfiddle.net/anacW/

function Person(gender) {
    this.gender = gender;
    document.write('Person instantiated</br>');
}

Person.prototype.walk = function(){
    document.write("is walking</br>");
};

Person.prototype.sayHello = function(){
    document.write("Hello</br>");
};

Person.prototype.sayGender = function(){
    document.write(this.gender + "</br>");
};



function Student() {
    //Person.call(this);
    document.write('Student instantiated</br>');        
}
Student.prototype = new Person();

Student.prototype.constructor = Student;

Student.prototype.sayHello = function(){
    document.write("Student says Hello</br>");
}
Student.prototype.sayGoodBye = function(){
    document.write("Student says goodbye</br>");
}

document.write("*** Building student1 *** </br>");
var student1 = new Student();
student1.sayHello();
student1.walk();
student1.sayGoodBye();

document.write("*** Building student2 ***</br>");
var student2 = new Student();
student2.sayHello();
student2.walk();
student2.sayGoodBye();

document.write("*** InstanceOf Tests ***</br>");
document.write("student1 is Person?: " + (student1 instanceof Person));
document.write("</br>");
document.write("student1 is Student?: " + (student1 instanceof Student));
document.write("</br>");
document.write("student2 is Person?: " + (student2 instanceof Person));
document.write("</br>");
document.write("student2 is Student?: " + (student2 instanceof Student));

This code gives:

Person instantiated
*** Building student1 *** 
Student instantiated
Student says Hello
is walking
Student says goodbye
*** Building student2 ***
Student instantiated
Student says Hello
is walking
Student says goodbye
*** InstanceOf Tests ***
student1 is Person?: true
student1 is Student?: true
student2 is Person?: true
student2 is Student?: true

Which shows you that the Person constructor is only being called once, and is never called by instantiating a Student. This might be desirable in your case (I don't know enough javascript to tell you whether it's 'proper' form or not).

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know any case where this is desirable; usually it leads to bugs (as far as the example isn't too simple). There are some cases for that code construct, but not in oo inheritance. –  Bergi Apr 2 '12 at 23:08

Yes, you will need it. In your example, all Students have the same gender and there will be only one Person instantiated, regardless of the number of instantiated Students.

Better would be:

function Student() {
    // gives this Student properties of one (new) Person:
    Person.call(this);
    document.write('Student instantiated</br>');        
} 
// does not create a Person, just makes Students have Person prototype features
Student.prototype = Object.create(Person.prototype);
share|improve this answer
1  
This answer should be accepted. It was asked why do we need to do Person.call(this); and it answers that. Try putting a debugger before Person.call(this); and see the value of this (Student); you will find that it doesn't have gender property before, but gets it as soon as parent is called. –  Om Shankar Feb 4 '13 at 7:23

Here how I do this:

Foo = function() {}
Foo.prototype.sayHello = function() { console.log("hello"); }

Bar = function() {}
Bar.prototype = new Foo();
Bar.prototype.sayBye = function() { console.log("bye"); }

var oBar = new Bar();
oBar.sayHello(); // "hello"
oBar.sayBye(); // "bye"
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes. But, in this approach, constructor of Bar is NEVER called. So, having anything private for "Bar" is meaningless. So, Bar is never initialized, all you use is Foo object. –  riship89 Feb 23 '12 at 18:44

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