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I have a method which implements different logic on data fetched from a DB depending on what the current date is.

I want to test it by having the unit test create objects, save them in the DB and invoke the tested method. However, in order to have predictable results I need to change the system date each time and I don't know how to do that in Java.

Suggestions?

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2  
change your method so that you indeed give the time as parameter, then you can test it by giving any time you want. What does speak agains this? –  belgther Feb 23 '12 at 9:19
    
Can you tell how are you getting the current date and time? Maybe mocking would work... –  Łukasz Rżanek Feb 23 '12 at 9:22
    
For now just with new Date(), maybe I do need a TimeProvider class –  Alex Feb 23 '12 at 9:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can generate your expected results using the current date.

Or you write your system to use a date/time you give it when being tested (rather than the clock) That way the time is always what the test expects.

I use something like

interface TimeSource {
    long currentTimeMS(); // actually I have currentTimeNS
    void currentTimeMS(long currentTimeMS);
}

enum VanillaTimeSource implements TimeSource {
    INSTANCE;

    @Override
    public long currentTimeMS() {
        return System.currentTimeMillis();
    }

    @Override
    public void currentTimeMS(long currentTimeMS) {
        // ignored
    }
}

class FixedTimeSource implements TimeSource {
    private long currentTimeMS;
    @Override
    public long currentTimeMS() {
        return currentTimeMS;
    }

    @Override
    public void currentTimeMS(long currentTimeMS) {
        this.currentTimeMS =              currentTimeMS;
    }
}

In tests I use a FixedTimeSource which can be data driven e.g. set by inputs/events. In production I use a VanillaTimeSource.INSTANCE which ignores times in inputs/events and uses the current time.

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First suggestion probably won't work. I should have also mentioned that what data exactly is fetched is also based on the date (according to a certain column). This means that even though the logic isn't different I'd have to generate different results based on pretty much every day of the year. I'll probably go for the second suggestion –  Alex Feb 23 '12 at 9:32
    
You can generate the expected result as a part of running the test, before you check the result. You don't need to generate them in advance. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 23 '12 at 9:34
    
Indeed making a class/component that receives the time as a parameter ensures it's a good component because it decouples from system-time. You put all the application-specific configuration ("using system time") outside the component. It only has to depend on external configurable stimuli. –  helios Feb 23 '12 at 9:46
    
Cool classnames. Cool solution. –  Pavel Ryzhov Mar 1 '13 at 16:00

You need to look at injecting something into your class that allows you to customize the way Time is presented.

For example

public interface TimeProvider {
   DateTime getCurrentTime();
}

public class UnderTest {

  // Inject this in some way (e.g. provide it in the constructor)
  private TimeProvider timeProvider;

  public void MyMethod() {
     if (timeProvider.getCurrentTime() == "1234") {
        // Do something
     }
  }
}

Now in your unit tests you can provide a fake implementation of time provider. In the real production code you can just return the current date time.

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Of course, you could also provide it as a parameter as belgther suggests :) –  Jeff Foster Feb 23 '12 at 9:20

I had a similar problem recently with code I couldn't refactor too much (time constraints, didn't want to inadvertently break anything). It had a method I wanted to test which called System.currentTimeMillis() and the case I wanted to test would depend on what that value returned. Something like:

public class ClassINeedToTest {
    public boolean doStuff() {
        long l = System.currentTimeMillis();
        // do some calculation based on l
        // and return the calculation
    }
}

To allow unit-testing, I refactored the class so it had a helper method which was protected

protected long getCurrentTimeMillis() {
     // only for unit-testing purposes
     return System.currentTimeMillis();
}

and this method was called by doStuff(). This didn't change the functionality but now meant that when I call it in the unit-test, I could then override this to return a specific value, like

ClassINeedToTest testClass = new ClassINeedToTest() {
    protected long getCurrentTimeMillis() {
        // return specific date for my test
        return 12456778L;
    }
}; 
boolean result = testClass.doStuff();
// test result with an assert here

This does however mean that I've polluted the interface of my class, so you may decide the cost is too high. There are probably better ways if you can refactor the code more.

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