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How do i can define a type List so that i could use it as:

var l1 = new List<int>();
var l2 = new List<int, long>();
var l3 = new List<int, long, byte>();

?

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What you are trying to achieve is unclear. The reason there is no List<T, T1, T2, ...> in .NET is that it's useless. You can just create a type that wraps int long and byte and make a list of that type. –  Baboon Feb 23 '12 at 9:58
    
What is your use case? You should explain us what you want to do. –  ken2k Feb 23 '12 at 10:22
    
The one thing that i try to archive is have List type, that can be created with different count of type parameters. In my realization it need to map some of types to List(instead of pass them to any method). –  devi Feb 23 '12 at 10:23
    
@devi How would you expect to populate a List<int, long> list? What do you want such a list to contain? int? long? Some sort of structure that contains two fields (int and long)? –  ken2k Feb 23 '12 at 10:32
    
That list populates from source, which can contain different types of items. List needs to know a set of available types to map source item. As example List can return IEnumerable<Item>, but source contains Item, Announcement and Task with different fields each. By that approach List can define types, which it can contain –  devi Feb 23 '12 at 10:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a list of tuples:

var l1 = new List<int>();
var l2 = new List<Tuple<int, long>>();
var l3 = new List<Tuple<int, long, byte>>();
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eventually inherit the Tuple class to make more concrete classes –  Adrian Iftode Feb 23 '12 at 10:01
    
Tuple is a good idea, but I think it should be mentioned that it requires .Net 4.0. –  ken2k Feb 23 '12 at 10:18
    
Use tuples not so clear as direct enumeration of types, but good idea. It have any analog in .net 3.5 ? –  devi Feb 23 '12 at 10:39
    
Not in the BCLs, but it is very straightforward to implement yourself. –  Tyson Feb 23 '12 at 10:41
    
My realization of List is so like to Tuple –  devi Feb 23 '12 at 11:47

Say you wanted to get the 3rd item from your l3 list - what would you do?

If your answer is "I'd cast it to long, since int and byte are both castable to long anyway", you should use a List<long> in the first place.

If you are going to use l3[3].GetType() and if else on the retrieved type, you should consider using a List<object>, as you're treating items as "of unknown type".

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So, i found a solution. It needs to define base type List:

 class List    {  }

And inherit a number of childs from it:

class List<T>    {  }

class List<T, T1> : List<T> { }

class List<T, T1, T2> : List<T> { }

(Inheritance is not necessarily, but it needs if List been castable to List )

Base List constructor can get all applied generic parameters:

class List
{
    Type[] _types;

    public List()
    {
        _types = GetType().GetGenericArguments();
    }
}
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"Just" inheriting List<T> is going to screw with you. You're gonna have to either override every member so that both collections get updated, or define an explicit operator that converters from one to the other. I Stress explicit because there is a loss of information (what happens for T1 and T2 when you cast to List<T> ?) –  Baboon Feb 23 '12 at 9:57
    
But that's still just a List<T> in the end. i.e. you will only be able to add and remove instances of type T, not T1 and T2. Or are you trying to accomplish something else? –  Tyson Feb 23 '12 at 9:57
    
The one thing that i try to archive is have List type, that can be created with different count of type parameters. In my realization it need to map some of types to List(instead of pass them to any method). Base constructor gets generic parameters and save them to a Type[] array –  devi Feb 23 '12 at 10:19

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