Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a query which returns a result set which looks like this:

A   |   B
---------------------
1   |   a
2   |   a
1   |   b
1   |   c
3   |   d

A|B is unique in the results (i.e. there will only ever be one 1|a row)

I need to write two queries based on these results. The first:

given a value for A (say 1), count the number of Bs who only have a single row; with a 1 in the A column.

so in the above data set, id expect to be returned the value 2, because B values b and c only have one row each, where those rows have a 1 in the A column. d would not be counted because it corresponds to a 3 and a would not be returned because it has an additional row with a 2.

Hope that makes sense.

The second query is the opposite to the above.

Given a value for A (say 1) count the number of Bs who have 2 or more rows, where one of the rows has a 1 in the A column.

So in the above data id expect to be returned 1, because the B value a is the only one that has multiple rows, with one of them with a 1 in the A column.

Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With CTEs and windowed aggregate functions, it could be done like this:

WITH
  sampledata (A, B) AS (
    SELECT 1, 'a' UNION ALL
    SELECT 2, 'a' UNION ALL
    SELECT 1, 'b' UNION ALL
    SELECT 1, 'c' UNION ALL
    SELECT 3, 'd'
  ),
  counted AS (
    SELECT
      A,
      B,
      COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY B) B_count
    FROM sampledata
  )
SELECT
  COUNT(*)
FROM counted
WHERE A = 1
  AND B_count = 1  /* change to "> 1" to get the other result */
share|improve this answer
    
how does this compare to Kirills answers with regards efficiency?, ive got a buttload of rows (100s of thousands) –  Andrew Bullock Feb 23 '12 at 11:09
    
@Andrew, It has worse performance scan due to grouping. –  Kirill Polishchuk Feb 23 '12 at 11:10
    
@AndrewBullock: What Kirill said, I guess. Semi-joins (in the form of EXISTS predicates) are often hard to beat, and all the harder with a query that has got grouping (which implies sorting, which is costly). So yes, if your tables are that big, I would probably go with Kirill's solutions. –  Andriy M Feb 23 '12 at 11:46
    
where A and B are uniqueidentifiers, this query runs in a second where as Kirills still hasnt returned in under a minute :s –  Andrew Bullock Feb 23 '12 at 18:20
add comment

Use:

declare @t table(A int, B char(1))

insert @t values
(1, 'a'),
(2, 'a'),
(1, 'b'),
(1, 'c'),
(3, 'd')

declare @x int = 1

select COUNT(*)
from @t t
where t.A = @x
    and not exists(select 1 from @t t2 where t2.B = t.B and t2.A <> @x)

select COUNT(*)
from @t t
where t.A = @x
    and exists(select 1 from @t t2 where t2.B = t.B and t2.A <> @x)

Queries provide exactly wanted result:

-----------
2    

-----------
1
share|improve this answer
1  
fantastic, thanks –  Andrew Bullock Feb 23 '12 at 10:47
    
You're welcome. –  Kirill Polishchuk Feb 23 '12 at 10:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.