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I'm using postgresql and wondering if I can do this in one request: I have a table with four columns: id, start, end and user_id In one request, I do a

SELECT sum(finish - start) as duration, user_id group by user_id

Now it would be great if I kept somewhere the ids of the fetched rows too because I need them later in the code Is this possible at all? Thanks a lot

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3 Answers 3

You should look into Window Functions and Partitions or perhaps array_agg.

Assuming this example:

CREATE TABLE mytable (
    id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
    user_id INTEGER,
    start INTEGER,
    finish INTEGER
);
INSERT INTO mytable(id, user_id, start, finish) VALUES (1, 1, 5, 10);  -- duration: 5
INSERT INTO mytable(id, user_id, start, finish) VALUES (2, 2, 10, 30); -- duration: 20
INSERT INTO mytable(id, user_id, start, finish) VALUES (3, 1, 15, 20); -- duration: 5

As you know, SELECT SUM(finish - start), user_id FROM mytable GROUP BY user_id will return:

10  | 1
20  | 2

I presume what you don't want is the output of this query (since you might as well not use aggregates if you use a column with a unique non-null constraint in your GROUP BY, as I presume id is): SELECT id, SUM(finish - start), user_id FROM mytable GROUP BY user_id, id.

Using a window function, you can used data from other rows related to the current row.

The following query:

SELECT id, SUM(finish - start) OVER (PARTITION BY user_id) AS duration, user_id
    FROM mytable ORDER BY user_id

produces these results:

1 | 10 | 1
3 | 10 | 1
2 | 20 | 2

You'll now get a row per id used, but the SUM applies to the entire set of rows within the window frame (here, all those with the same user_id as the current row).

As far as your application is concerned, you would probably then need to read the rows one by one and store the relevant values of id somewhere until user_id changes.

Alternatively, you could use array_agg to aggregate all the IDs into an array:

SELECT array_agg(id), SUM(finish - start) AS duration, user_id
    FROM mytable GROUP BY user_id ORDER BY user_id, duration


{1, 3}  | 10 | 1
{2}     | 20 | 2

If, for example, you want this in a space-separated string, use array_to_string on top of this:

SELECT array_to_string(array_agg(id), ' '), SUM(finish - start) AS duration, user_id
    FROM mytable GROUP BY user_id ORDER BY user_id, duration
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Thanks a lot Bruno, this is exactly what I was looking for! –  Pompon Vdp Feb 23 '12 at 11:52
    
@PomponVdp: This seems to be the solution to your question. So would you please up-vote the answer (if you didn't already) and accept the answer as the best solution to your question. To do so click the V under the vote counter. –  tscho Feb 23 '12 at 21:21

If you want a string as result (not an array), then you can simplify the task with string_agg() in PostgreSQL 9.0 or later:

SELECT user_id
     , sum(finish - start) AS duration
     , string_agg(id, ', ') AS ids
FROM   tbl
GROUP  BY 1
ORDER  BY 1
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Assuming that id is the row id, have you tried this?

SELECT id, sum(finish - start) as duration, user_id group by id, user_id
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