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I thought I had this nailed, and then I go and look at some source at work and am left wondering why there are so many contradictions in what I read from msdn and what I am seeing in source....

My understanding is that the virtual keyword can be used in method declarations to allow any deriving classes to override it.

The override keyword would then need to be used in the derived class when implementing the superclass' virtual method....

For example:

public abstract class A
{
    public virtual string GetName();
}


public class B:A
{

    //assume there are some defined properties.
    public override string GetName()
    {
        return FirstName;
    }
}

I have a few questions:

1) Is it really necessary to define a method as virtual if it has no implementation? Surely it can just be overwritten in the subclass without the use of virtual and override?

2) If (1) is incorrect, am I right in thinking that every virtual method must be overridden in the subclass using it....

EDIT:

You're right my code will not compile... I want to know why....I uinderstand your answers but then I saw this:

public abstract class RequestHandler<TRequest, TResponse> : RequestHandler, IRequestHandler<TRequest>, IRequestHandler, IDisposable, ITypedRequestHandler
    where TRequest : global::Agatha.Common.Request
    where TResponse : global::Agatha.Common.Response, new()
{
    protected RequestHandler();

    public virtual void AfterHandle(TRequest request);
    public virtual void BeforeHandle(TRequest request);
    public override Response CreateDefaultResponse();
    public TResponse CreateTypedResponse();
    public override Response Handle(Request request);
    public abstract Response Handle(TRequest request);
}

The above doesnt cause the compiler to complain...

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Your example does not compile ("A.GetName() must declare a body because it is not marked abstract, extern, or partial"). –  dtb Feb 23 '12 at 11:08
    
Would your Class A compile note its missing abstract ? –  V4Vendetta Feb 23 '12 at 11:09
    
Surely the method in class A should be public abstract string GetName(); –  Vedran Feb 23 '12 at 11:11
    
Any ideas about the above source in the edit, surely according to your answers the above source is invalid - but the compiler doesn't complain –  user559142 Feb 23 '12 at 11:23
    
I do think the above source is invalid. Unfortunately it looks like it is referencing things (Agatha) that I don't have. Can you reduce it to a smaller code sample that doesn't do the external references and still exhibits the same behaviour? –  Chris Feb 23 '12 at 11:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Firstly the above code is invalid. A virtual method still has to have a body with a default implementation. to do what you have done above you would need to use the abstract keyaord instead of virtual.

abstract means that there is no method body provided but that any class deriving from it must implement this method (unless it is abstract too).

I think this pretty much answers your questions....

  1. If it has no implementation then it cannot be virtual, it must be abstract. If it has an implementation that just does nothing then that must be implemented.

  2. The whole point of a virtual class is that it has default behaviour so you can choose whether or not to override it. If it were abstract then you would have to override it (unless you were deriving another abstract class).

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Yes that's exactly what I thought but I have some source here which doesn;t cause the compiler to complain... please see edit above –  user559142 Feb 23 '12 at 11:11
    
Exactly. If actually the body existed, with virtual it would not enfore the inherited class to implement the method. –  Maurice Stam Feb 23 '12 at 11:12
    
Thanks that makes sense but I am still confused about the above source in the edit –  user559142 Feb 23 '12 at 11:22

Is it really necessary to define a method as virtual if it has no implementation?

You can make the method abstract (it will implicitly make it virtual).

Surely it can just be overwritten in the subclass without the use of virtual and override?

If you just "overwrite" it without explicitly overriding it, it won't be the same method, and calling the method on a variable of the base class won't call the derived method (it won't participate in polymorphism). You would just be "hiding" the method of the base class (the compiler actually warns you about this, if it's really what you want to do you must use the new modifier.)

An example will make it clearer:

class B
{
    public virtual void M() { Console.WriteLine("B.M") };
}

class D1 : Base
{
    // Hides the base method
    public new void M() { Console.WriteLine("D1.M") };
}


class D2 : Base
{
    // Overrides the base method
    public override void M() { Console.WriteLine("D2.M") };
}

...

D1 d1 = new D1();
d1.M(); // Prints "D1.M"
B b1 = d1;
b1.M(); // Prints "B.M", because D1.M doesn't override B.M

D2 d2 = new D1();
d2.M(); // Prints "D2.M"
B b2 = d2;
b2.M(); // Also prints "D2.M", because D2.M overrides B.M

If (1) is incorrect, am I right in thinking that every virtual method must be overridden in the subclass using it....

No, only if it's abstract... a virtual method can have an implementation, and in that case derived classes are not forced to override it.

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1) Is it really necessary to define a method as virtual if it has no implementation? Surely it can just be overwritten in the subclass without the use of virtual and override?

As said in other answers, virtual methods need to have implementations. You are confusing it with abstract.

If you were asking whether virtual methods which do have an implementation need to be declared virtual: In C#, yes, it is necessary. In Java, you can override any old method. It was a C# design decision to require overriding to be specifically allowed with the virtual keyword, so that methods cannot be overridden unless intended by the programmer.

If the programmer has not expressed intent by not using virtual, you can still "override" methods, with the new keyword. However, this works a bit differently. Hopefully this code will help illustrate the concept:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var baseC = new BaseClass();
        var extC = new ExtClass();
        var lazyC = new LazyClass();

        Console.WriteLine(baseC.NewMethod());
        Console.WriteLine(baseC.VirtualOverrideMethod());

        Console.WriteLine("---");

        Console.WriteLine(extC.NewMethod());
        Console.WriteLine(extC.VirtualOverrideMethod());

        Console.WriteLine("---");

        Console.WriteLine(((BaseClass) extC).NewMethod());
        Console.WriteLine(((BaseClass) extC).VirtualOverrideMethod()); // Redundant typecast

        Console.WriteLine("---");

        Console.WriteLine(lazyC.VirtualOverrideMethod());

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public class BaseClass
    {
        public BaseClass()
        {

        }

        public string NewMethod()
        {
            return "NewMethod of BaseClass";
        }

        public virtual string VirtualOverrideMethod()
        {
            return "VirtualOverrideMethod of BaseClass";
        }
    }

    class ExtClass : BaseClass
    {
        public new string NewMethod()
        {
            return "NewMethod of ExtClass";
        }

        public override string VirtualOverrideMethod()
        {
            return "VirtualOverrideMethod of ExtClass";
        }
    }

    class LazyClass : BaseClass
    {
    }
}

Output:

NewMethod of BaseClass
VirtualOverrideMethod of BaseClass
---
NewMethod of ExtClass
VirtualOverrideMethod of ExtClass
---
NewMethod of BaseClass
VirtualOverrideMethod of ExtClass
---
VirtualOverrideMethod of BaseClass

2) If (1) is incorrect, am I right in thinking that every virtual method must be overridden in the subclass using it....

Not at all. virtual is a way of saying, "it's okay if you want to override this method". In fact, I included LazyClass in my code above to show this.

The above doesnt cause the compiler to complain...

I haven't used interfaces much, but that looks like one. In my code, if I change

    class ExtClass : BaseClass
    {
        public new string NewMethod()
        {
            return "NewMethod of ExtClass";
        }

        public override string VirtualOverrideMethod()
        {
            return "VirtualOverrideMethod of ExtClass";
        }
    }

to:

    class ExtClass : BaseClass
    {
        public new string NewMethod()
        {
            return "NewMethod of ExtClass";
        }

        public override string VirtualOverrideMethod()
        {
            return "VirtualOverrideMethod of ExtClass";
        }
    }

I get:

error CS0501: 'OverrideTest.Program.ExtClass.VirtualOverrideMethod()' must declare a body because it is not marked abstract, extern, or partial

From Visual Studio 2010. The same goes for the virtual method of my BaseClass.

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The need for virtual is dictated by polymorphism. Think about what happens when you redefine a method in a subclass using new:

class Parent
{
    void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("Parent"); }
    virtual void Bar { Console.WriteLine("Parent"); }
}

class Child : Parent
{
    new void Foo() { Console.WriteLine("Child"); } // another method Foo
    override void Bar { Console.WriteLine("Child"); }
}

var child = new Child();    // a Child instance
var parent = (Parent)child; // same object, but statically typed as Parent

c.Bar(); // prints "Child"
p.Bar(); // again, prints "Child" -- expected virtual behavior

c.Foo(); // prints "Child"
p.Foo(); // but this prints "Parent"!!

For this reason, classes that are intended to be derived from (i.e. not sealed) should always mark the methods that can be overridden as virtual -- otherwise there will be confusing runtime behavior like above. There's no difference if the parent implementation actually does anything or not; the point is that it behaves differently.

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ok, by declaring the method as virtual (and not wishing to override the method in the subclass), you'd be entering the world of method hiding if you were to introduce a method with the same name into the subclass. You have to define it as thus:

public abstract class A
{
    public virtual string GetName()
    {
        return null;
    }
}

public class B : A
{
    //assume there are some defined properties.
    public new string GetName()
    {
        return FirstName;
    }
}

I'd recommend that you think of the abstract override approach:

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract string GetName()
}

// to override
public class B : A
{
    //assume there are some defined properties.
    public override string GetName()
    {
        return FirstName;
    }
}

this would be quite different. I would strongly recommend that you just override the abstract method in the subclass.

However, here's a quick ref on the subject (old but a good read):

http://www.akadia.com/services/dotnet_polymorphism.html

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This will not compile, you cannot hide an abstract method. –  Pratik Feb 23 '12 at 11:14
    
ahh -ok, in which case Class A has to be virtual then. will amend answer –  jim tollan Feb 23 '12 at 11:19
    
You actually can not avoid override abstract method. It's a mandatory. –  Tigran Feb 23 '12 at 11:20

1) Is it really necessary to define a method as virtual if it has no implementation? Surely it can just be overwritten in the subclass without the use of virtual and override?

You can use an abstract methods, that have no body, but they if you derive from that class you must to override that method. All abstact methods have to be overriden in child class.

2) If (1) is incorrect, am I right in thinking that every virtual method must be overridden in the subclass using it....

No, instead, you can use a virtual keyword to have an implementation inside that, but do not making override in a child class mandatory. Gives you more flexibility, from that point of view.

Usauly they use abstract to create rigid constrains for childs, so every child derived from it must implement specified member of base class.

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That's exactly the difference between a virtual and an abstract method:

A virtual method can be overridden by derived classes if the choose to. A virtual method may or may not have a default implementation for inheritors to call into, which is done using the base keyword.

An abstract method must be overridden by derived classes. Its constraints are:

  • It can only be defined in an abstract class.
  • It cannot have an implementation, since it's up to the inheritors to define its behavior.
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