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I am trying to understand why this program doesn't work

Expected output: numbers 0-19 in random order What I get when I run: some numbers repeat, sometimes 20 is printed.

Please help. I tried with lock(obj) in DoSomething() but it didn't help.

Program

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    public delegate void callbackDelegate(int x);
    class Program
    {
        void processCallback(int x)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("IN callback: The value I got is " + x);
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();
            p.processinThreads();
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public void DoSomething(int x, callbackDelegate callback)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            //Console.WriteLine("I just woke up now " + x);
            callback(x);
        }

        public void processinThreads()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
            {
                Thread t = 
new Thread(new ThreadStart(()=>DoSomething(i, processCallback)));
                t.Start();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of C# Captured Variable In Loop –  Matthias Feb 23 '12 at 12:03
    
right, I couldn't get this when I searched for this problem. Well I don't know this 'closure over lambda problem' :) –  satya Feb 23 '12 at 12:08
    
Avoid manual thread creation. Here is a detailed explanation with benchmarks why –  Anastasiosyal Feb 23 '12 at 13:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
public void processinThreads()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    {
        int local = i;
        Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(()=>DoSomething(local, processCallback)));
        t.Start();
    }
}

Your problem is related to closure over lambda.

share|improve this answer
    
That solved it! Thanks. now learning 'closure over lambda' –  satya Feb 23 '12 at 12:09
    
+1, good catch! –  sll Feb 23 '12 at 12:10
1  
Check out this article: Closing over the loop variable considered harmful. It will be fixed in C# 5.0. –  Paolo Moretti Feb 23 '12 at 12:19
    
Please accept the answer if was helpful. –  Jakub Konecki Feb 23 '12 at 12:55
    
@PaoloMoretti : Thanks for the link. It's very good. –  satya Feb 23 '12 at 13:19

You should just use the TPL, its a lot easier and recommended over manual thread management:

Parallel.For(0, 20, x => {
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    Console.WriteLine("IN callback: The value I got is " + x);
});

This will also block until the loop finishes, if you don't want that you can use the TPL Task, but I would definitely recommend avoiding threads.

share|improve this answer
    
Moreover, this is likely to be more efficient: Spawning another thread is pretty expensive. The TPL uses an (automagically computed) optimum number of threads and re-uses them. –  Matthias Meid Feb 23 '12 at 12:11
    
+1 for improving the code rather than just fixing it. –  Matthias Feb 23 '12 at 12:11
    
perhaps the OP is bound to an earlier version of the framework... –  clearpath Feb 23 '12 at 12:23
    
@user676571 I am planning to use TPL with Async pattern applied. –  satya Feb 23 '12 at 13:18

As Jakub already told you, you need to copy i into another local variable local. In your code, the Delegates have direct access to i itself, not a copy of i, so they print out the very current value of i, which may be greater than when you started the thread. This is called closure.

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